quag

(redirected from quags)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to quags: FEHS

quag

 (kwăg, kwŏg)
n.
A quagmire.

[Perhaps variant of Middle English quabbe, from Old English *cwabba.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

quag

(kwæɡ; kwɒɡ)
n
(Physical Geography) another word for quagmire
[C16: perhaps related to quake; compare Middle Low German quabbe]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quag - a soft wet area of low-lying land that sinks underfootquag - a soft wet area of low-lying land that sinks underfoot
bog, peat bog - wet spongy ground of decomposing vegetation; has poorer drainage than a swamp; soil is unfit for cultivation but can be cut and dried and used for fuel
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

quag

noun
A usually low-lying area of soft waterlogged ground and standing water:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
'worm' was a monster of vast size and power--a veritable dragon or serpent, such as legend attributes to vast fens or quags where there was illimitable room for expansion.
It is based on QUAGS (Goddijn, Bouwer, and Bredeweg 2003) and reorganized into a component that automatically generates multiple-choice questions for arbitrary QR models.
The king's body is borderless, fluent, like his realm: it is an island building itself or eroding itself, its substance washed out into the waters salt and fresh; it has its shores of polder, its marshy tracts, its reclaimed margins; it has tidal waters, emissions and effusions, quags that slough in and out of the conversation of Englishwomen, and dark mires where only priests should wade, rush lights in their hands.