quahog

(redirected from Quahogs)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Quahogs: quahaug, Hard clam, Littleneck clams

qua·hog

also qua·haug  (kō′hôg′, -hŏg′, kwô′-, kwō′-)
n.
An edible clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) of the Atlantic coast of North America, having a hard rounded shell. Also called hard-shell clam, round clam.

[Narragansett poquaûhock.]

quahog

(ˈkəʊˌhɒɡ) ,

quohog

or

quahaug

n
(Animals) an edible clam, Venus (or Mercenaria) mercenaria, native to the Atlantic coast of North America, having a large heavy rounded shell. Also called: hard-shell clam, hard-shell or round clam Compare soft-shell clam
[C18: from Narraganset, short for poquauhock, from pohkeni dark + hogki shell]

qua•hog

or qua•haug

(ˈkoʊ hɔg, -hɒg, ˈkwoʊ-, ˈkwɔ-)

n.
a thick-shelled, edible clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, of Atlantic North American coasts.
[1745–55, Amer.; < Narragansett (E sp.) poquaûhock]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quahog - Atlantic coast round clams with hard shellsquahog - Atlantic coast round clams with hard shells; large clams usually used for chowders or other clam dishes
Mercenaria mercenaria, hard clam, Venus mercenaria, hard-shell clam, quahaug, quahog, round clam - an edible American clam; the heavy shells were used as money by some American Indians
clam - flesh of either hard-shell or soft-shell clams
littleneck, littleneck clam - a quahog when young and small; usually eaten raw; an important food popular in New York
cherrystone, cherrystone clam - small quahog larger than a littleneck; eaten raw or cooked as in e.g. clams casino
2.quahog - an edible American clamquahog - an edible American clam; the heavy shells were used as money by some American Indians
clam - burrowing marine mollusk living on sand or mud; the shell closes with viselike firmness
genus Venus, Venus - type genus of the family Veneridae: genus of edible clams with thick oval shells
littleneck, littleneck clam - a young quahog
cherrystone, cherrystone clam - a half-grown quahog
hard-shell clam, quahaug, quahog, round clam - Atlantic coast round clams with hard shells; large clams usually used for chowders or other clam dishes
References in classic literature ?
The front door walk is bordered with quahog clam-shells -- `cow-hawks,' Janet calls them; there is Virginia Creeper over the porch and moss on the roof.
Anne had not been especially enthusiastic over the idea of surrounding her flower beds with quahog shells; as a decoration they did not appeal to her on first thought.
The first article (Part I) reviewed the range, biology, and ecology of quahogs, gave an historical overview of the industry (including wampum manufacture and usage and the use of quahogs in clambakes), and described harvesting gears and methods.
Most of them had been sealed inside fossil Mercenaria campechiensis or southern quahogs. Portell said that as clams die, fine sediment and particles wash inside.
The scientists reached the conclusion in studying the decline in the harvest of four commercially important species of shellfish in coastal areas from Maine to North Carolina -- eastern oysters, northern quahogs, softshell clams and northern bay scallops.
Quahogs (Mercenaria mercenaria) were not explicitly simulated, but their impact on the ecosystem was included in the EcoWin.NET ecosystem model (e.g., Nunes et al.
Quahogs are a species of hard-shelled clam that can be found in various sizes.
I learn Ocean Quahogs are part of a sustainable fishery, which has been regulated for the past 34 years by the National Marine Fisheries Service.
The bivalves are eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica; northern quahogs, Mercenaria mercenaria; softshell clams, Mya arenaria; and bay scallops, Argopecten irradians spp.
Adult oysters reportedly can filter up to 50 gallons a day, while large quahogs (hard clams) can clean about 24 gallons of water a day.
The recall is focused squarely on mussels and mahogany quahogs, another name for clams, harvested between Sunday and Friday of last week in the Jonesport area and clams from along a roughly 60-mile coastal stretch between Cranberry Point and Cow Point in the southeast.