quakeproof

quake·proof

 (kwāk′pro͞of′)
adj.
Designed or constructed to withstand or resist the effects of an earthquake.
tr.v. quake·proofed, quake·proof·ing, quake·proofs
To make quakeproof.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

quake•proof

(ˈkweɪkˌpruf)

adj.
1. designed or built to withstand an earthquake.
v.t.
2. to make quakeproof.
[1935–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

quakeproof

(inf)
adj building etcerdbebensicher
vterdbebensicher machen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Few buildings are quakeproof. And few residents are willing to believe it when a building manager says their building is safe.
Dubai Authorities assuaged public fears yesterday following Tuesday's 7.8 magnitude earthquake in Iran stressing that the UAE is not on a major fault line and has historically taken steps to quakeproof its buildings while enacting world-class emergency preparedness plans.
Kansai Electric plans to use a quakeproof meeting room next to a reactor control room as a substitute until a seismic-isolated building is completed in fiscal 2015.
An official with the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) said the Bushehr nuclear power plant is quakeproof and the Fukushima-like crises would never occur there.
He also need to take steps to increase the proportion of quakeproof homes from the current 76 percent, as one estimate says around 5,000 people may die if a magnitude 7 earthquake strikes Tokyo.
Only 74,335 meet the conventional quakeproof standards put into force in 1981, or 56.8 percent, up only 2.1 percentage points from the previous survey a year earlier, the Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Ministry added.
After the 1906 disaster, Lawson was determined to build a quakeproof, fireproof house.
Rescue missions discovered the majority of local buildings failed to meet quakeproof construction standards.
The agency told the utility to immediately examine the buildings and consider reinforcement work if they are judged as not sufficiently quakeproof.
He will also need to take steps to increase the number of quakeproof homes from the current 76 percent, as one estimate says around 5,000 people may die if a magnitude 7 earthquake strikes Tokyo.