quantum cryptography


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

quantum cryptography

n.
Any of various techniques that exploit quantum-mechanical phenomena, such as superposition or quantum entanglement, to generate and share between two parties a private key that can be used to encrypt and decrypt data. Current techniques also reveal any attempt to intercept the private key during its creation.

quantum cryptography

n
(Atomic Physics) a method of coding information based on quantum mechanics, which is said to be unbreakable
Translations
cryptographie quantique
References in periodicals archive ?
The latter is a core technology of quantum cryptography communications that generates quantum keys that can be shared safely between two communicating users.
Then, Section VI addresses quantum cryptography, which is the first application to an implementable communication system.
Quantum cryptography is also well known as quantum key distribution (QKD).
Swi^ty, "CCIS 149 - quantum cryptography protocol simulator", Multimedia Communications, Services and Security Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol.
China is among a growing number of countries seeking to unlock the science of quantum cryptography and computing, which many experts believe will one day revolutionize computerized security.
5 ( ANI ): A team of British scientists have reportedly discovered a way to build communications networks using quantum cryptography and impenetrable codes, crucial for sensitive electronic data transfer.
Summary: London: Researchers have come up with a way of protecting telecoms networks using quantum cryptography .
Quantum cryptography relies on the rules of quantum theory to generate uncrackable codes that encrypt data in a way that reveals if it has been eavesdropped or tampered with.
This result was the product of the three-way collaboration between the University of Tokyo, Fujitsu, and NEC, and represents a milestone in quantum key distribution because it combines a single-photon emitter, which is ideal for optical transmission bands, with a prototype of a practical quantum cryptography system.
A September 2009 NATO-sponsored research workshop on theoretical and applied aspects of quantum cryptography and computing attracted contributors from the US, Europe, and countries of the former Soviet Union.
No doubt the C-57D crew was trying to send a coded message back to Earth, made safe from eavesdropping by the use of quantum cryptography.