quantum electrodynamics


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Related to quantum electrodynamics: quantum field theory

quantum electrodynamics

n. (used with a sing. verb)
The quantum theory of the electromagnetic interaction and the properties and behavior of electrons, positrons, photons, and the electromagnetic field.

quantum electrodynamics

n (functioning as singular)
(Atomic Physics) physics a relativistic quantum mechanical theory concerned with electromagnetic interactions. Abbreviation: QED

quan′tum electrodynam′ics


n.
(used with a sing. v.) the quantum-mechanical theory of the electromagnetic field and its interaction with electrons and positrons. Abbr.: QED
[1925–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quantum electrodynamics - a relativistic quantum theory of the electromagnetic interactions of photons and electrons and muons
quantum field theory - the branch of quantum physics that is concerned with the theory of fields; it was motivated by the question of how an atom radiates light as its electrons jump from excited states
Translations
kvantna elektrodinamika
References in periodicals archive ?
Meis sets out the main principles of the electromagnetic theory and quantum electrodynamics, both developed for understanding the nature of light and explaining the associated phenomena when it interacts with nature.
He has developed a number of theories of quantum electrodynamics, and based on these calculated radiative corrections for a number of quantum electrodynamic effects in the interaction of elementary particles of high energy (together with R.
Nobel lecture: the development of the space-time view of quantum electrodynamics.
To give a simple example, let us have a look at how quantum electrodynamics describes the interaction between light and an electron.
Chapter 3 provides an excellent introduction to Feynman's approach to quantum electrodynamics and to his reformulation of quantum mechanics using the path integral.
Feynman shared the 1965 Nobel physics prize with Sin-Itiro Tomonaga and Julian Schwinger for "fundamental work in quantum electrodynamics, with deep-ploughing consequences for the physics of elementary particles:' Krauss here gives us useful perspective on how physicist Freeman Dyson was crucial in Feynman's career and fame.
It may even turn out to be the case that one of the most well-established theories in all of physics, quantum electrodynamics, will need to be revamped to reconcile the conflicting data.
But if borne out in further experiments, the findings could challenge fundamental precepts of quantum electrodynamics, the theory of how quantum light and matter interact, say its authors.
The second theory, quantum electrodynamics, is more attractive as it gives a physical picture.
In recent decades, there has been a partial success of Quantum electrodynamics (QED), which united quantum theory and electromagnetism and explained some behavior of electrons and photons.
Such a measurement could reveal anomalies in quantum electrodynamics, the modern theory of the atom.
The theory of quantum electrodynamics has now lasted more than fifty years and has been tested more and more accurately over a wider and wider range of conditions.

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