quantum field theory


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quantum field theory

n.
The application of quantum mechanics to physical systems described by fields, such as electromagnetic fields, developed to make quantum mechanics both consistent with the theory of special relativity and more readily applicable to systems involving many particles or the creation and destruction of particles.

quantum field theory

n
(Atomic Physics) physics quantum mechanical theory concerned with elementary particles, which are represented by fields whose normal modes of oscillation are quantized
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quantum field theory - the branch of quantum physics that is concerned with the theory of fields; it was motivated by the question of how an atom radiates light as its electrons jump from excited states
quantum physics - the branch of physics based on quantum theory
QED, quantum electrodynamics - a relativistic quantum theory of the electromagnetic interactions of photons and electrons and muons
QCD, quantum chromodynamics - a theory of strong interactions between elementary particles (including the interaction that binds protons and neutrons in the nucleus); it assumes that strongly interacting particles (hadrons) are made of quarks and that gluons bind the quarks together
References in periodicals archive ?
As mentioned in the Introduction, there are a lot of attempts to introduce the GUP into quantum field theory. If the field theory is built on the Lorentz invariant deformed commutation relations, the deformed KG/Dirac equations are covariant in curved spacetime.
Tuning the Mind in the Frequency Domain: Karl Pribram and the Quantum Field Theory of Consciousness
D, (2008), Quantum Field Theory Demystified, The McGraw-Hill Companies.
Instead of quantum field theory, we have program- matic and hyper-personalised messaging.
Finally, it is worth pointing out that the interaction picture does not exist in an interacting relativistic quantum field theory; this is the essence of the Haag theorem (see Section 11.1.1 in [5] and/or Section 3.1.d in [4]).
In recent years, researchers have discovered that such a "material universe" can host all other particles of relativistic quantum field theory. Three of these quasiparticles, the Dirac, Majorana, and Weyl fermions, were discovered in such materials, despite the fact that the latter two had long been elusive in experiments, opening the path to simulate certain predictions of quantum field theory in relatively inexpensive and small-scale experiments carried out in these "condensed matter" crystals.
The quantum field theory approach to quantum mechanics is on a solid footing.
of Kiel, Germany) explains the main underlying concepts and major results of quantum field theory. The first volume can serve as a textbook for an introductory graduate course, and covers kinematical and dynamical aspects of classical relativistic field theory, operator methods and functional integral methods for relativistic quantum field theory, non-relativistic quantum mechanics, and quantum field theory at non-zero temperature.
This is a broad overview of modern particle physics encompassing early concepts through modern quantum field theory. The authors rely on analogy to encourage understanding of complex concepts.
Such matter is predicted by quantum field theory to exist, though only in quantities too small for the construction of a time machine.
He and others later constructed the quantum field theory of quarks and gluons called quantum chromodynamics, which seems to account for all the nuclear particles and their strong interactions.
The American physicist Richard Feynman gave his name to a series of seminal diagrams--also known as Stukelberg or Penguin diagrams--which have been described as types of book-keeping devices for performing calculations in quantum field theory. The diagrams illustrate the often tortuous calculations required to unstitch and then reconfigure the various phenomenologies that comprise the abstract world of theoretical physics.

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