quark star


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quark star

n.
A hypothetical celestial object that is the remnant of a massive star that has collapsed with gravitational pressure sufficient to reduce all constituent particles to strange quarks. Also called strange star.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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However, an international team of scientists has managed to capture a GMB - which is thought to occur when a massive star collapses into a neutron or quark star or a black hole, or when two neutron stars merge - in unprecedented detail.
Hereafter, the following notational conventions will be used: we denote the quantities referred to SPC by wiggles, while the corresponding quantities of neutron star or quark star are left without wiggles.
Burrows, "Beta decay in quark stars," Physical Review Letters, vol.
(2009) are, either that the neutron star has not yet developed a strong enough magnetic field, or it became a black hole with a very low accretion rate, or that it underwent a phase transition and became a quark star. Chan predicts this would have been accompanied by rapid fluctuations in the initial neutrino flux, leaving an object currently radiating about 0.1 per cent of the energy coming from radioactive decay.
One such bizarre object is termed a strange quark star. It is "strange" because its supply of dense matter is composed primarily of strange quarks, which would represent a stage of collapse even denser than that characterizing a neutron star.
A resulting quark star, for example, would consist of up and down quarks, which make up protons and neutrons, and also strange quarks, which are heavier and not found in ordinary matter.
On closer look, however, each showed evidence of being an even smaller, denser object called a quark star or strange star.
Now it appears the star may be a more bizarre--and up until now hypothetical--object called a quark star, says Jeremy J.
Even though the theory remains somewhat controversial, studies of QPOs may one day lead to the unambiguous identification of a quark star.
The nuggets could be made in processes associated with a quark star, a star made up of a lot of quarks stuck together -- if such a thing happens to be at the heart of Cyg X-3.
These findings can impact the physics of hybrid stars (neutron stars with quark matter) or strange quark stars in several ways.
''If details of high-density conditions become clear, I think research to understand the mass of protons and neutrons, as well as in neutron stars and even higher-density quark stars, will progress significantly,'' said Masahiko Iwasaki, chief researcher of the government-affiliated Institute of Physical and Chemical Research and a member of the group.