quasar


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Related to quasar: pulsar, black hole

qua·sar

 (kwā′zär′, -sär′, -zər, -sər)
n.
A compact, extremely bright celestial object whose power output can be hundreds to several thousand times that of the entire Milky Way galaxy. Quasars are among the most distant objects in the universe and are generally considered to be a form of active galactic nucleus.

[From earlier quas(i-stell)ar (radio source).]

quasar

(ˈkweɪzɑː; -sɑː)
n
(Celestial Objects) any of a class of extragalactic objects that emit an immense amount of energy in the form of light, infrared radiation, etc, from a compact source. They are extremely distant and their energy generation is thought to involve a supermassive black hole located in the centre of a galaxy
[C20: quas(i-stell)ar (object)]

qua•sar

(ˈkweɪ zɑr, -zər, -sɑr, -sər)

n.
any of numerous starlike extragalactic objects that may be the most distant and brightest objects in the universe.
[1964; quas(i-stell)ar, in quasi-stellar radio source, the first type of quasar discovered]

qua·sar

(kwā′zär′)
An extremely distant, compact, star-like celestial object. The power output of a quasar is several thousand times that of the Milky Way galaxy.
Did You Know? "The universe is not only stranger than we imagine," Albert Einstein said. "It is stranger than we can imagine." In the 1960s, astronomers found some very strange objects that we now call quasars in the far reaches of the universe. A quasar is like a far-off floodlight. It appears to be an extremely distant star putting out huge amounts of energy. In fact, just one of these objects can be a trillion times brighter than the sun. All of the radiation that a quasar gives off comes from a small area at its center, and many astronomers believe that the source of the energy is an enormous black hole rotating at the center of a young galaxy. Quasars are among the most distant celestial objects known. Some are more than ten billion light-years away, meaning their radiation has taken ten billion years to reach us. So when we look at quasars, we're observing these objects as they were billions of years ago, and we're able to see part of the early history of the universe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quasar - a starlike object that may send out radio waves and other forms of energy; many have large red shifts
celestial body, heavenly body - natural objects visible in the sky
Translations
كْوازار: جِسْم نَجْمي
kvazar
kvasar
kvazár
dulstirni, kvasi
kvazaras
kvazārs
kvasar
kuazar

quasar

[ˈkweɪzɑːʳ] Ncuasar m, quásar m

quasar

[ˈkweɪzɑːr] nquasar m

quasar

nQuasar m

quasar

[ˈkweɪzɑːʳ] n (Astron) → quasar f inv

quasar

(ˈkweisaː) noun
a star-like object which gives out light and radio waves.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is a chance that the quasar lies in a second, less luminous galaxy that's behind the galaxy that Hubble imaged.
To push this to the extreme, maybe every dusty starburst galaxy hosts a quasar and we just cannot see the quasars," Fu said.
More work is needed now to examine the extremely red quasars population further and understand its relationship to the general phenomenon of quasars and, perhaps, to a particularly violent young phase of quasar-galaxy evolution.
8 September 2016 - US-based safety science provider UL has acquired Nottingham, UK-based chemical regulatory compliance software solutions provider Safeware Quasar, the company said.
These quasar winds get their speed from the intense radiation emitted by the disk, which glows as bright as roughly 22 trillion suns.
According to a new study published in the British journal "Nature" on Thursday, the quasar is 12 billion times the masses of the Sun and 430 trillion times brighter than the Sun.
In this study, the researchers detected the fluorescent glow of hydrogen gas resulting from its illumination by intense radiation from the quasar.
8220;With over 10,000 UV lasers deployed, Spectra-Physics is the leader in UV lasers, and Quasar 355-45 further demonstrates our extensive UV expertise,” says Dave Allen, general manager and senior vice president for Spectra-Physics.
In the last five years, Quasar has built nine "digesters" that use microbes and enzymes to turn food waste, fry oils, sewage and animal manure into gases containing a high percentage of methane.
In other words, the pressure of the falling gas and dust may not go such high required for a quasar to emit energy as amount of that emitted by hundred billions of the Sun.
Quasar Elite is fantastic fun for everyone from seven years old upwards and with this great offer your can try it completely FREE.
Nasdaq: CSUN), a specialised solar cell and module manufacturer, had delivered its first commercial Quasar module shipments to Switzerland-based, Sunergic SA.