quatrain

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Related to Quatrains: sonnet, Iambic pentameter

quat·rain

 (kwŏt′rān′, kwŏ-trān′)
n.
A stanza or poem of four lines.

[French, from Old French, from quatre, four, from Latin quattuor; see kwetwer- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

quatrain

(ˈkwɒtreɪn)
n
(Poetry) a stanza or poem of four lines, esp one having alternate rhymes
[C16: from French, from quatre four, from Latin quattuor]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

quat•rain

(ˈkwɒ treɪn)

n.
a stanza or poem of four lines, usu. with alternate rhymes.
[1575–85; < French, =quatre four (< Latin quattuor) + -ain < Latin -ānus -an1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

quatrain

A group of four lines, usually rhymed.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quatrain - a stanza of four lines
elegiac stanza - a quatrain in iambic pentameter with abab rhyme scheme
heroic stanza - a quatrain consisting of two heroic couplets written in an elevated style; the rhyme scheme is abab
stanza - a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
katren

quatrain

[ˈkwɒtreɪn] Ncuarteto m, estrofa f de cuatro versos
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

quatrain

nVierzeiler m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Much I remembered, possibly two-thirds of the quatrains, and I managed to piece out the remainder without difficulty.
I was interested as to which quatrain he would like best, and was not surprised when he hit upon the one born of an instant's irritability, and quite at variance with the Persian's complacent philosophy and genial code of life:
What remains of his verse mostly takes the form of quatrains, yet for originality of thought, wealth of imagery and style, they have seldom been excelled.
In his sonnets he abandoned the form followed by Wyatt and adopted (still from the Italian) the one which was subsequently used by Shakspere, consisting of three independent quatrains followed, as with Wyatt, by a couplet which sums up the thought with epigrammatic force, thus: a b a b c d c d e f e f g g .
Wyatt, it should be observed, generally departs from the Petrarchan rime-scheme, on the whole unfortunately, by substituting a third quatrain for the first four lines of the sestet.
He thought he had caught Pellisson, but the latter escaped him; he turned towards Sorel, who had, himself, just composed a quatrain in honor of the supper, and the Amphytrion.
Some will perhaps think that they detect in the first quatrain an indication of a lost line, which later rhapsodists, failing in imaginative vigour, have supplied by the feeble device of iteration.
The ceremony connected with the song was a drinking ceremony.(That is perhaps a painful fact, but then, you know, we cannot reform our forefathers.) During the first and second quatrain, sung decidedly forte, no can was filled.
But now, immediately before the third quatrain or chorus, sung fortissimo, with emphatic raps of the table, which gave the effect of cymbals and drum together, Alick's can was filled, and he was bound to empty it before the chorus ceased.
Two other very plausible explanations exist: First, the great flaming star, a foot broad, and a cubit high, which fell from heaven, as every one knows, upon the law courts, after midnight on the seventh of March; second, Théophile's quatrain,--
The idea of the last quatrain is also very effective.
Having thought his life, the poet wrote about 300 poems, including ghazals, qasidas ("lyrics"), and rubais ("quatrains").