quay

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Related to Quays: wharves

quay

 (kē, kā, kwā)
n.
A wharf or reinforced bank for the loading or unloading of ships or boats.

[Middle English keye, from Old North French cai, of Celtic origin.]

quay

(kiː)
n
(Human Geography) a wharf, typically one built parallel to the shoreline. Compare pier1
[C14 keye, from Old French kai, of Celtic origin; compare Cornish hedge, fence, Old Breton cai fence]

quay


(kē, kā, kwā),
n.
a landing place, esp. one of solid masonry, constructed along the edge of a body of water; wharf.
[1690–1700; sp. variant (after French quai) of earlier kay (also key, whence the modern pronunciation) < Old French kay, cay, akin to Sp cayo shoal. See key2]

quay

A structure of solid construction along a shore or bank that provides berthing and generally provides cargo-handling facilities. A similar facility of open construction is called a wharf. See also wharf.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quay - wharf usually built parallel to the shorelinequay - wharf usually built parallel to the shoreline
pier, wharf, wharfage, dock - a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats

quay

noun dock, pier, landing, harbour, berth, wharf, jetty, pontoon, slipway, landing stage Jack and Stephen were waiting for them on the quay.
Translations
nábřežínákladištěpřístaviště
kaj
laituri
pristanište
rakodópartrakpart
hafnarbakki
埠頭
부두선창
izbūvēta krastmalamolspiestātne
nákladisko
nabrežje
kaj
ที่ที่เอาเรือเข้าเทียบท่า
bến tàu

quay

[kiː] Nmuelle m
on the quayen el muelle

quay

[ˈkiː] nquai m
on the quay → sur le quai

quay

nKai m; alongside the quayam Kai

quay

[kiː] nmolo, banchina

quay

(kiː) , (kei) noun
a solid, usually stone, landing-place, where boats are loaded and unloaded. The boat is moored at the quay.
ˈquayside noun
the side or edge of a quay. The boat was tied up at the quayside.

quay

رَصِيفُ الـمِينَاء nábřeží kaj Kai αποβάθρα muelle laituri quai pristanište banchina 埠頭 선창 kade kai nadbrzeże cais причал kaj ที่ที่เอาเรือเข้าเทียบท่า iskele bến tàu 码头
References in classic literature ?
As Thar Ban rode noiselessly up the broad avenue which leads from the quays of Aaanthor to the great central plaza, he and his mount might have been mistaken for spectres from a world of dreams, so grotesque the man and beast, so soundless the great thoat's padded, nailless feet upon the moss-grown flagging of the ancient pavement.
Keeping in the shadows of the great monoliths that line the Avenue of Quays of sleeping Aaanthor, he approached the plaza.
The whole French court ran to the harbor, while the quays and jetties were soon covered by crowds of people.
Stay," said he: "we want two places in your boat;" and wrapping five or six pistoles in paper, he threw them from the quay into the boat.
I spent long hours in the Louvre, the most friendly of all galleries and the most convenient for meditation; or idled on the quays, fingering second-hand books that I never meant to buy.
The whole city, high and low, the quays bordering the Patapsco, the ships lying in the basins, disgorged a crowd drunk with joy, gin, and whisky.
Little by little the scene on the quay became more animated; sailors of various nations, merchants, ship-brokers, porters, fellahs, bustled to and fro as if the steamer were immediately expected.
I first beheld him on the quay, a complete stranger to me, obviously not a Hollander, in a black bowler and a short drab overcoat, ridiculously out of tone with the winter aspect of the waste-lands, bordered by the brown fronts of houses with their roofs dripping with melting snow.
The coadjutor proceeded onward to the quay by way of the Rue de la Monnaie; there he found groups of bourgeois clad in black cloaks or gray, according as they belonged to the upper or lower bourgeoisie.
A dense crowd soon assembled on the quay, waiting for them to disembark.
Half the sky was chequered with black thunderheads, but all the west was luminous and clear: in the lightning flashes it looked like deep blue water, with the sheen of moonlight on it; and the mottled part of the sky was like marble pavement, like the quay of some splendid seacoast city, doomed to destruction.
It was then, as it is to-day, an irregular trapezoid, bordered on one side by the quay, and on the other three by a series of lofty, narrow, and gloomy houses.