qubit

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Related to Qubits: Quantum computing

qu·bit

 (kyo͞o′bĭt′)
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

qubit

(ˈkjuːbɪt)
n
(Computer Science) computing a quantum bit
[C20: from qu(antum) + bit4]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
qubit
qubit
qubit
qubit
References in periodicals archive ?
Apart from the difficulty of getting qubits to maintain their quantum states for more than a few microseconds, the problems include designing electronic controls that can operate at extremely low temperatures.
Theoretically, the world's fastest-existing supercomputers would be shown down by a quantum computer that uses something in the range of 50 qubits, a threshold called quantum supremacy.
Unlike standard computer memory which uses a list of bits - zeros and ones - to represent one of two states at any given time, qubits (quantum bits) ignore traditional laws of physics, and all possible lists of zeros and ones can exist simultaneously.
While in the case of a classical computing machine the data is stored and processed as bits (having the values 0 or 1), in the case of a quantum computing machine, the basic unit of quantum information under which the data is stored and processed is represented by the quantum bits, or qubits that can have besides the values of 0 and 1, a combination of both these values in the same time, representing a "superposition" of them [12].
Just a couple of months ago, scientists were able to achieve teleportation by transferring qubits (quantum bits of information) to a diamond.
However, these quantum bits, or qubits for short, do not display the special characteristics of SchrE[micro]dinger's cat in contrast to the 20 qubits that the team of researchers have now created using a programmable quantum simulator thus establishing a new record that is still valid even if other physical approaches with optical photons, trapped ions or superconducting quantum circuits are taken into account.
Quantum computers, however, use "qubits" (quantum bits), which are "fuzzy" superpositions of zeroes and ones, thus automatically carrying much more information.
The "time machine" described in the journal Scientific Reports consists of a rudimentary quantum computer made up of electron "qubits".
The zigzag lines in the photo are printed wires connecting the chip's qubits to the outside world.
CEA-Leti and Inac, a joint fundamental research institute between the CEA and the University Grenoble Alpes, have announced a breakthrough toward large scale fabrication of qubits. They demonstrated on a 300-mm pre-industrial platform a new level of isotopic purification in a film deposited by chemical vapor deposition, enabling the creation of qubits in thin layers of silicon using a very high purity silicon isotope, [sup.2]8Si.