quean

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quean

 (kwēn)
n.
1. A woman regarded as being disreputable, especially a prostitute.
2. Scots A young woman.

[Middle English quene, from Old English cwene, woman; see gwen- in Indo-European roots.]

quean

(kwiːn)
n
1. archaic
a. a boisterous, impudent, or disreputable woman
b. a prostitute; whore
2. Scot a young unmarried woman or girl
[Old English cwene; related to Old Saxon, Old High German quena, Gothic qino, Old Norse kona, Greek gunē woman. Compare queen]

quean


(kwēn),
n.
1. an impudent woman; hussy.
3. Scot. a girl or young woman.
[before 1000; Middle English quene, Old English cwene, c. Middle Dutch quene, kone, Old High German quena, Old Norse kona, Gothic qino < Germanic *kwenōn-, < c. Old Irish ben, Greek gynḗ, Skt jáni < Indo-European *gwen-Ha; akin to queen]
References in classic literature ?
It's yon flaysome, graceless quean, that's witched our lad, wi' her bold een and her forrard ways - till - Nay
But since your reverend wisdom hath discovered this Jewish quean to be a sorceress, perchance it may account fully for his enamoured folly.
Good Luck, she is never a lady, But the cursedest quean alive, Tricksy, wincing, and jady - Kittle to lead or drive.
1) Scholars over the last two decades have demonstrated the importance of repertory context for understanding dramatic form; see especially Roslyn Knutson, The Repertory of Shakespeare's Company, 1594-1613 (Fayetteville AR, 1991) and Playing Companies and Commerce in Shakespeare's Time (Cambridge, 2001) as well as Andrew Gurr, The Shakespearian Playing Companies (Oxford, 1996); Mary Bly, Queer Virgins and Virgin Queans on the Early Modern Stage (Oxford, 2000); Sally-Beth MacLean and Scott McMillin, The Queen's Men and Their Plays (Cambridge, 1998); Sally-Beth MacLean and Lawrence Manley, Lord Strange's Men and their Plays (New Haven, 2014); and Lucy Munro, Children of the Queen's Revels: A Jacobean Theatre Repertory (Cambridge, 2005).
Bly, Queer Virgins and Virgin Queans on the Early Modern Stage, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000: 135-36.
Award-winning ice creams will also be served, from acclaimed local restaurant Queans.
27) James Naughtie, 'Loons and queans and orramen', in the Guardian (G2), 25 November 2015, pp.
Liddie, An Old-Spelling, Critical Edition of The History of The Two Maids of More-Clacke (New York: Garland, 1979), 13-24, and Mary Bly, Queer Virgins and Virgin Queans on the Early Modern Stage (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000), 47-50.
Banana and whisky, rhubarb crumble and dark chocolate and orange are just some of the sinfully delicious iced treats the chef and owner of Queans has created.
A two-story, 82,000-s/f industrial building at 132-05 Atlantic Avenue in Jamaica, Queans, tenanted for at least the next 20 years by New York City's Department of Sanitation, is on the market for sale through Eastern Consolidated priced at $12 million.
had thae been queans, / A' plump and strapping in their teens) before catching himself up and wagging his finger at his errant hero ('Ah, Tam
Kinraddie's lovers, like Wester Cairns', observe rural traditions, and illegitimacy is common: John Gordon, for example, has "two-three queans in trouble and him but barely eighteen years old" (30).