quicklime


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

quick·lime

 (kwĭk′līm′)
[Middle English qwyke lyme, living lime (translation of Latin calx vīva) : quick, qwyke, living; see quick + lime, lyme, lime; see lime3.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

quicklime

(ˈkwɪkˌlaɪm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) another name for calcium oxide
[C15: from quick (in the archaic sense: living) + lime1]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lime1

(laɪm)

n., v. limed, lim•ing. n.
1. a white or grayish white, lumpy, very slightly water-soluble solid, CaO, used chiefly in mortars, plasters, and cements, and in the manufacture of steel, paper, glass, and various chemicals of calcium.
2. a calcium compound for improving crops grown in soils deficient in lime.
v.t.
4. to treat (soil) with lime or compounds of calcium.
5. to smear (twigs, branches, etc.) with birdlime.
6. to catch with or as if with birdlime.
7. to paint or cover (a surface) with a composition of lime and water; whitewash.
[before 900; Old English līm, c. Middle Dutch, Old High German, Old Norse līm]

lime2

(laɪm)

n.
1. the small, greenish yellow, acid fruit of a citrus tree, Citrus aurantifolia, allied to the lemon.
2. the tree that bears this fruit.
3. a greenish yellow.
adj.
4. of the color lime.
5. of or made with limes.
[1615–25; < Sp lima < Arabic līmah, līm citrus fruit < Persian līmū(n)]

lime3

(laɪm)

n.
the European linden, Tilia europaea.
[1615–25; unexplained variant of obsolete line, lind, Middle English, Old English lind. See linden]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quicklime - a white crystalline oxide used in the production of calcium hydroxide
atomic number 20, Ca, calcium - a white metallic element that burns with a brilliant light; the fifth most abundant element in the earth's crust; an important component of most plants and animals
oxide - any compound of oxygen with another element or a radical
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
جير حَي، كِلْس غَيْر مُطْفَأ
nehašené vápno
brændt kalk
oltatlan mész
brennt kalk
nehasené vápno
sönmemiş kireç

quicklime

[ˈkwɪklaɪm] Ncal f viva
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

quicklime

[ˈkwɪklaɪm] nchaux vive
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

quicklime

nungelöschter Kalk
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

quicklime

[ˈkwɪkˌlaɪm] ncalce f viva
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

quick

(kwik) adjective
1. done, said, finished etc in a short time. a quick trip into town.
2. moving, or able to move, with speed. He's a very quick walker; I made a grab at the dog, but it was too quick for me.
3. doing something, able to do something, or done, without delay; prompt; lively. He is always quick to help; a quick answer; He's very quick at arithmetic.
adverb
quickly. quick-frozen food.
ˈquickly adverb
ˈquicken verb
to make or become quicker. He quickened his pace.
ˈquickness noun
ˈquicklime noun
lime which has not been mixed with water.
ˈquicksands noun plural
(an area of) loose, wet sand that sucks in anyone or anything that stands on it.
ˈquicksilver noun
mercury.
ˌquick-ˈtempered adjective
easily made angry.
ˌquick-ˈwitted adjective
thinking very quickly. a quick-witted policeman.
ˌquick-ˈwittedly adverb
ˌquick-ˈwittedness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
You will find a change of clothes hidden in the malt-house, and an old caldron full of quicklime. Destroy the clothes you have got on, and dress yourself in the other clothes that you find.
Errors in this respect could lead to a greatly reduced and poor quality return of quicklime. Where demand warranted, the development of large draw kilns helped to provide much greater quality control.
Here, using both surface and underground methods, more than 200,000 t/month of high-grade limestone is produced, then transported to Donghae for processing to quicklime rather than cement.
A member of the so-called Generation of 1927, Alberti revealed Gongorist influence in the work published in that period, El alba del alheli (1927; "The Dawn of the Wallflower") and Cal y canto (1928; "Quicklime and Song").
Unique to treatment plants in Illinois, this process stabilizes sludge by adding quicklime to sludge that has been dewatered on a belt press.
After the ashes and the quicklime, after the horses in the church and the riders with long swords cutting down the simple men running, even after the women and nailed to the woodwork, even after all that, there is a singing about paradise.
And although most infected animals are buried with corrosive quicklime, he doubts that ranchers use enough of the chemical to kill all the infectious particles.
"In addition to bricks and cellular concrete blocks, the plant produces porous concrete, quicklime and slaked lime, as well as quartz sand," the source noted.
Between 2018 and 2023, total lime production is expected to top 380 million tons, according to CW Research's 2018 update of the Global Quicklime, Slaked Lime and Hydraulic Lime Market Report.
However, there is little research and application on FMLS mixed with fly-ash and quicklime (FMLSF) as abutment backfill.
Zombies" series, and Quicklime Games,the developer of "Need For Speed: World."