quid pro quo

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quid pro quo

 (kwĭd′ prō kwō′)
n. pl. quid pro quos also quids pro quo
Something that is given in return for something else or accepted as a reciprocal part of an exchange.

[Latin quid prō quō : quid, something + prō, for + quō, ablative of quid, something.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

quid pro quo

(ˌkwɪd prəʊ ˈkwəʊ)
n, pl quid pro quos
1. a reciprocal exchange
2. something given in compensation, esp an advantage or object given in exchange for another
[C16: from Latin: something for something]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

quid pro quo

(ˈkwɪd proʊ ˈkwoʊ)

n., pl. quid pro quos, quids pro quo.
something that is given or taken in return for something else; substitute.
[1555–65; < Latin: literally, something for something]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

quid pro quo

A Latin phrase meaning something for something, used to mean a fair exchange or something given in exchange for something else.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quid pro quo - something for something; that which a party receives (or is promised) in return for something he does or gives or promises
retainer, consideration - a fee charged in advance to retain the services of someone
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

quid pro quo

noun exchange, interchange, tit for tat, equivalent, compensation, retaliation, reprisal, substitution The statement is emphatic that there must be a quid pro quo.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
יד רוחצת יד
egyenértékellenértékellenszolgáltatásviszontszolgáltatás

quid pro quo

[ˈkwɪdprəʊˈkwəʊ] N (quid pro quos (pl)) → compensación f (for por)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

quid pro quo

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

quid pro quo

[ˌkwɪdprəʊˈkwəʊ] n (reciprocal exchange) → contraccambio
his promotion was the quid pro quo for his support → venne promosso in cambio del suo appoggio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
'They bring the body, and we pay the price,' he used to say, dwelling on the alliteration - 'QUID PRO QUO.' And, again, and somewhat profanely, 'Ask no questions,' he would tell his assistants,
"I also strongly support the Prime Minister's declaration that there should be no quid pro quos when it comes to the hostages," Mr Bush said.
To justify the exhibition's peculiar slant, however, Virilio has offered only the elliptical observation that September II inaugurated an "inevitable confusion between a terrorist attack and an accident," in that the terroristic stratagem consisted of seizing upon "the accident" as a form of "disguise." "Ce qui arrive...," in turn, seized upon this singularly loaded "disguise," and in doing so not only conscientiously perpetuated the inevitable confusion," but also participated in a well-known Virilian stratagem, fraught with ever so many quid pro quos, to restore the gothic chill to technology and place the malice irremediably inside.