quid

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quid 1

 (kwĭd)
n.
A cut, as of chewing tobacco.

[Middle English quide, cud, from Old English cwidu.]

quid 2

 (kwĭd)
n. pl. quid or quids Chiefly British
A pound sterling.

[Possibly from Latin, something, what; see quiddity.]

quid

(kwɪd)
n
a piece of tobacco, suitable for chewing
[Old English cwidu chewing resin; related to Old High German quiti glue, Old Norse kvātha resin; see cud]

quid

(kwɪd)
n, pl quid
1. (Currencies) slang Brit one pound sterling
2. quids in slang Brit in a very favourable or advantageous position
3. not the full quid slang Austral and NZ mentally subnormal
[C17: of obscure origin]

quid1

(kwɪd)

n.
a portion of something, esp. tobacco, that is to be chewed but not swallowed.
[1720–30; dial. variant of cud]

quid2

(kwɪd)

n., pl. quid.
Brit. Informal. one pound sterling.
[1680–90; orig. uncertain]
cud, quid - The etymological base of cud appears to be "glutinous substance"; quid—"piece of tobacco for chewing"—is a variant of cud.
See also related terms for tobacco.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quid - the basic unit of money in Great Britain and Northern Irelandquid - the basic unit of money in Great Britain and Northern Ireland; equal to 100 pence
British monetary unit - monetary unit in Great Britain
penny - a fractional monetary unit of Ireland and the United Kingdom; equal to one hundredth of a pound
2.quid - something for something; that which a party receives (or is promised) in return for something he does or gives or promises
retainer, consideration - a fee charged in advance to retain the services of someone
3.quid - a wad of something chewable as tobaccoquid - a wad of something chewable as tobacco
bite, morsel, bit - a small amount of solid food; a mouthful; "all they had left was a bit of bread"
Translations
funt

quid

1 [kwɪd] N (Brit) → libra f (esterlina)
three quidtres libras
to be quids inhaber ganado bastante

quid

2 [kwɪd] N [of tobacco] → mascada f (de tabaco)

quid

[ˈkwɪd] [quid] (pl) n (British)livre f
to be quids in (= better off) → être gagnant(e) financièrement
They're quids in, thanks to the EC
BUT C'est tout bénef > pour eux grâce à la CE.quid pro quo [ˌkwɪdprəʊˈkwəʊ] ncontrepartie f

quid

1
n pl <-> (Brit inf) → Pfund nt; 20 quid20 Eier (sl); to be quids inauf sein Geld kommen (inf)

quid

2
n (= tobacco)Priem m

quid

[kwɪd] n (Brit) (fam) (pl inv) → sterlina
References in classic literature ?
Freddy had half a quid and his friend had four half-crowns.
Septimius Severus in despatch; Adeste si quid mihi restat agendum.
She was knocked down to her for fifty-five quid by the third-assistant-resident-commissioner.
Penelon rolled his quid in his cheek, placed his hand before his mouth, turned his head, and sent a long jet of tobacco-juice into the antechamber, advanced his foot, balanced himself, and began, -- "You see, M.
Why, I even went back over my accounts and paid Sweitzer fifty quid I'd jiggered him out of in a deal in Fiji three years before.
The captain hitched up his trousers, then shifted his quid thoughtfully.
The man whom he called Morgan--an old, grey-haired, mahogany-faced sailor--came forward pretty sheepishly, rolling his quid.
His brimmed hat of worn felt was well pulled over his eyes, and he revolved a quid of tobacco in his left cheek.
When you see him 'quid, said the savage, honing his harpoon in the bow of his hoisted boat, then you quick see him 'parm whale.
I bet there's a hundred men in Sydney right now that would fork over twenty quid for the right of calling you his."
The old man was advertising for me then, and a chum I had with me had a no- tion of getting a couple quid out of him by writ- ing a lot of silly nonsense in a letter.
He would sell it for two quid. Black men's heads he would sell for one quid.