quietism

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qui·et·ism

 (kwī′ĭ-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. A form of Christian mysticism enjoining passive contemplation and the beatific annihilation of the will.
2. A state of quietness and passivity.

qui′et·ist n.
qui′et·is′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

quietism

(ˈkwaɪəˌtɪzəm)
n
1. (Christian Churches, other) a form of religious mysticism originating in Spain in the late 17th century, requiring withdrawal of the spirit from all human effort and complete passivity to God's will
2. a state of passivity and calmness of mind towards external events
ˈquietist n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

qui•et•ism

(ˈkwaɪ ɪˌtɪz əm)

n.
a form of Christian mysticism first promulgated in the late 17th century, requiring extinction of the will and worldly interests, and passive meditation on the divine.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

quietism

a 17th-century Christian mystical theory, originated in Spain by Molinos and promulgated in France by Fénelon, involving passive contem-plation and surrender of the will to God and indifference to the demands of the self or the outside world, declared heretical through efforts of the Inquisition. — quietist, n., adj.
See also: Heresy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quietism - a form of religious mysticism requiring withdrawal from all human effort and passive contemplation of God
mysticism, religious mysticism - a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate reality
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

quietism

[ˈkwaɪɪtɪzəm] Nquietismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

quietism

nQuietismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Both are quietists, yet in this respect they differ, that the former is the grey quietist, the latter the pearl.
The rapture of the Moravian and Quietist; the opening of the internal sense of the Word, in the language of the New Jerusalem Church; the revival of the Calvinistic churches; the experiences of the Methodists, are varying forms of that shudder of awe and delight with which the individual soul always mingles with the universal soul.
The most natural way for quietists to do all of these things is by becoming constitutivists about RKRS.
For him, "quietists" and "Jihadists" share ends, but not means.
He covers Quakers and the mystical tradition, Robert Barclay and John Cassian, Sara Lynes Grubb and Jeanne Guyon: quietists among Quakers, Caroline Stephen and Johannes Tauler, Rufus Jones on Jacob Boehme, and Teresina Rowell Havens and Buddhist mysticism.
The conflict between Khamenei's camp and the quietists reached an explosive turn on March 10, when a confrontation took place over the storming of Iran's London embassy by the critics led by an Iraqi Shi'ite cleric.
Imam Sistani's quietists command the overwhelming majority of the world's Shi'ite population, estimated at 200m.
Some Salafists, who Rabil calls "quietists," are largely apolitical and seek to unite Muslims under the banner of pure Islam.
Its Salafi critics fall into two categories: the quietists fearing militant challenges to the Al-Saud family's control of the kingdom and enjoin obedience to the ruler even if unjust, and reformists who reject IS' totalitarianism as contradicting Salafist tradition that promotes freedom of expression and endorses opposition to authority.
Religious reformers are quietists - wanting to see the theocrats gradually withdraw from politics - and call for closer links to the West.