quillback


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quill·back

 (kwĭl′băk′)
n. pl. quillback or quill·backs
A North American freshwater fish (Carpiodes cyprinus) that has one ray of the dorsal fin extending conspicuously beyond the others.

quillback

(ˈkwɪlˌbæk)
n
(Animals) a freshwater fish of the sucker family native to North America, identified by its long, quill-like dorsal fin

quill•back

(ˈkwɪlˌbæk)

n., pl. -backs, (esp. collectively) -back.
a sucker, Carpiodes cyprinus, of the central and eastern U.S., having one ray of the dorsal fin greatly elongated.
[1880–85, Amer.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Modeling submergence success of discarded yellow-eye rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus) and quillback rockfish (Sebastes maliger): towards improved estimation of total fishery removals.
Electrofishing surveys in the west and main branches of the Pearl River yielded 17 southeastern blue sucker, as well as 22 blacktail redhorse Moxostoma poecilurum, 37 quillback Carpiodes cyprinus, 47 highfin carpsucker C.
elongatus included: Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), Spotted Gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), Longnose Gar (Lepisosteus osseus), Gizzard Shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), Threadfin Shad (Dorosoma petenense), Central Stoneroller (Campostoma anomalum), Blacktail Shiner (Cyprinella venusta), Whitetail Shiner (Cyprinella galacturus), River Carpsucker (Carpiodes carpio), Quillback (Carpiodes cyprinus), Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio), Smallmouth Buffalo (Ictiobus bubalus).
Twelve species were collected only in pools and included black bullhead, black crappie, blackstripe topminnow, brown bullhead, flathead catfish, gizzard shad, orange-spotted sunfish, pumpkinseed, quillback, red-ear sunfish, spotted sucker, and white sucker.
Age validation of quillback rockfish (Sebastes maliger) using bomb radiocarbon.
Of the total of 86 species, two are native and riverine, of which one form (longnose gar) has now been extirpated in New Jersey, and the second fibrin (quillback) is poorly known in the state.
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife A yelloweye rockfish (left) and a quillback rockfish swim off of Cape Perpetua in the summer of 2001.
Fish species consumed were categorized as anadromous (e.g., chinook and coho salmon), bottom (e.g., sole), pelagic (e.g., quillback and copper rockfish), and shellfish.
eiythrurum (Rafinesque)], spotted sucker [Minytrema melanops (Rafinesque)], quillback [Carpiodes cyprinus (Lesueur)], and silver redhorse [M.