quillman

quillman

(ˈkwɪlmən)
n, pl -men
obsolete a person who uses a quill to write, esp in a work capacity; a clerk
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
* Breanna Ibendahl and Seth Lollis of Eldorado, twin daughters, Emma and Ella; grandparents Christal Wagoner of Carrier Mills, Brian Ibendahl of Paducah, Ky., Crystal Lollis, Beth Quillman and Steven Lollis
Quillman from Department of Public Works Environmental at the National Training Center, Fort IrMn, California, contributed logistical support and funding.
Other clinicians further developed eccentric viewing training by incorporating various ideas and equipment to facilitate teaching people with a macular scotoma to view eccentrically (Goodrich & Quillman, 1977; Holcomb & Goodrich, 1976; Quillman, 1980).
The authors thank James Ferrari for helpful comments on the manuscript and his invaluable advice and guidance during this study; two anonymous reviewers for their constructive comments that improved an earlier draft of the manuscript; Mickey Quillman, Directorate of Public Works at Ft.
CONTACT: Bob Quillman, Franchise & Affinity Market Relations; Karen Mandrell, Franchise & Affinity Market Relations
"We've always been early adopters of any research-based improvements in patient care," says Jerri Quillman, executive vice president for Floyd Memorial, "and we have the structure in place to be able to act when something new comes out.
Peggy Quillman, a library specialist in Palo Alto, Calif., arrives early to do all the behind-the-scenes work at her library, content in knowing it will be ready for book lovers when they arrive each day.
This research has been summarized (Barraga, Collins, & Hollis, 1977; O'Donnell & Livingston, 1991; Tavernier, 1993) and theoretical models of visual functioning have been developed (Corn, 1989; Hall & Bailey, 1989; Overbury, Goodrich, Quillman, & Faubert, 1989; Rogow & Rathwell, 1989).
The program was modeled after the inpatient Hines Blind Rehabilitation Center low vision rehabilitation program, that has been shown to be effective in previous outcomes studies (Stelmack, Moran, Dean, & Massof, 2007; Stelmack, Stelmack, & Massof, 2002; Stelmack et al., 2006) using lessons that were adopted from or are similar to those found in manuals and textbooks on low vision therapy (Backman & Inde, 1979; Freeman & Jose, 2000; Jose, 1985; Lund & Watson, 1997; Quillman, 1980; Wright & Watson, 1995).
Further information and application forms are available from Gail Quillman at gquillman@corecomm.net, (630) 323-1299 or at 156 Burlington Ave., Clarendon Hills, IL 60514-1203.