quillwork


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quill·work

 (kwĭl′wûrk′)
n.
Material or ornamentation made with overlaid porcupine quills by certain Native Americans.

quillwork

(ˈkwɪlˌwɜːk)
n
1. (Crafts) a type of decoration for textiles using dyed porcupine quills, traditionally used by Native Americans
2. (Crafts) the use of scrolled paper for the purpose of ornamentation or decoration
References in periodicals archive ?
$2,400 Sioux Beaded Hide Tobacco Bag; sinew-sewn and beaded using colors of red white-heart, pea green, dark blue, and white; rawhide slats are wrapped with red and blue quillwork, overall length 32 in., fourth quarter 19th century.
Don't miss Alice Adams' Beaded Circle Crossing (at the B gates), whose massive aluminum arches and glass tubes pay homage to Native American tipis, beadmaking, and quillwork. flydenver.com/art.
A meticulous skill that has been passed down for generations, quillwork is a form of embellishment that uses the quills of porcupines to decorate bowls, boxes, bags, shoes, knife holsters, and more.
Traditional live Potawatomi music, storytelling, dance presentations, educational sessions, craft-making, beading and porcupine quillwork demonstrations.
Three are hairlock shirts, adorned with locks of either human or horse hair, and panels of intricate quillwork; one shirt also has painted war honours.
As a community educator, she has expanded her repertoire to include other traditional arts like tufting and quillwork. She showcases her beadwork in juried art shows and is a member of the Native Roots Artist's Guild.
Known in France for their elaborate porcupine quillwork on bison skins, Illinois women were celebrated for their art.
Like Penelope, the Lakota grandmother of myth is always working and reworking the strip of quillwork on her buffalo robe.
Arapaho women's quillwork; motion, life, and creativity.
Arapaho Women's Quillwork: Motion, Life, and Creativity
I had grown accustomed to the quillwork of the North American First Nations women who embroidered their delicate designs with colourfully dyed, 5-centimetre-long quills of the North American porcupine, Erethizon dorsatum.
Yvonne Jobin, traditional artist, designer and spiritualist of Cree First Nations offers a variety of classes in traditional beadwork, moccasin-making, medicine wheel teachings, ceremonial drums and porcupine quillwork at her gallery in Inglewood.