quinquereme


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quinquereme

(ˌkwɪŋkwɪˈriːm)
n
1. (Historical Terms) an ancient Roman galley with five banks of oars on each side
2. (Nautical Terms) an ancient Roman galley with five banks of oars on each side
[C16: from Latin quinquerēmis, from quinque- + rēmus oar]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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There was a little international trade but that was mainly of extremely valuable goods which could not be locally produced: 'quinquereme of Nineveh ...
141-54; Derek Gagen, 'Puppets and Politics: Rafael Alberti' Dos farsas revolucionarias' Quinquereme, 7 (1984), 54-73.
The Dog has a downer on daft names for new and make-over bars, and has set up a spoof pub design outfit which will give establishments names such as aspire, barramundi, bar dado, enculer, flange, gnu, hubris, impetigo, jodhpur, komodo-modo, the.laundry, mauve, narcissus, obloquy, quinquereme, resume, sputum, underlay, varicosa, whelk, yarmulke or zabaglione.
The representation of a quinquereme probably occurred in the coinage of Baalshillem II (56): its use by Phoenicians is otherwise attested in the Diodorus' account of the revolt of Tennes: "Sidon has more than 100 triremes and quinqueremes." (57) The Aradian coinage bore also a war-galley on the reverse, as a permanent type; smaller denominations have only the prow.
Here's Leigh Fermor in Mani, watching a cruise ship pass offshore: The liner followed the same path as many a Phoenician galley and many a quinquereme; heading northward in the invisible groove of Harald Hardraada's ships, sailing shield-hung and dragon-prowed from the Byzantine splendour of Mickelgaard for grey northern fjords.
Scale is evoked with numbers and measurements: two hundred and forty quinquereme prous: archers four cubits high(49) and five-cubit armoured statues; fifteen-foot torches; total height of a hundred and thirty cubits.
"Note on 8 or [infinite]." Quinquereme 6 (1983): 102-5.
[20.] See Christopher Flood, 'Constructing the meaning of conflict: the discourse of the French Right on the Spanish Civil War', Quinquereme, xiii (1990/91), 29-45.
(45) For further discussion of the signifier-sensitive ethos, and the use of puns, see Stephen Hart, 'James Joyce and Cesar Vallejo: Excentricity and the Disinherited Mind', Quinquereme, 9 (1986), 171-89.