quoit


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quoit

 (kwoit, koit)
n.
1. quoits(used with a sing. verb) A game in which players toss rings of metal, rope, or rubber at a stake, trying to get each ring to land with the stake through its center or close to the stake.
2. One of the rings used in this game.

[Middle English coyte, flat stone, quoit, from Old French coilte, coite, from Latin culcita, cushion.]

quoit

(kɔɪt)
n
1. (Games, other than specified) a ring of iron, plastic, rope, etc, used in the game of quoits
2. slang Austral a variant spelling of coit
[C15: of unknown origin]

quoit

(kwɔɪt, kɔɪt)

n.
1. quoits, (used with a sing. v.) a game in which rings of rope or flattened metal are thrown at an upright peg, the object being to encircle it.
2. a ring used in the game of quoits.
v.t.
3. to throw like a quoit.
[1350–1400; Middle English coyte, of obscure orig.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quoit - game equipment consisting of a ring of iron or circle of rope used in playing the game of quoitsquoit - game equipment consisting of a ring of iron or circle of rope used in playing the game of quoits
game equipment - equipment or apparatus used in playing a game
Translations

quoit

[kwɔɪt] Naro m, tejo m quoitsjuego msing de los aros
to play quoitsjugar a los aros

quoit

nWurfring m

quoit

[kɔɪt] nanello (per il gioco degli anelli)
to play quoits → giocare agli anelli
References in classic literature ?
Achilles next offered the massive iron quoit which mighty Eetion had erewhile been used to hurl, until Achilles had slain him and carried it off in his ships along with other spoils.
Ajax son of Telamon threw third, and sent the quoit beyond any mark that had been made yet, but when mighty Polypoetes took the quoit he hurled it as though it had been a stockman's stick which he sends flying about among his cattle when he is driving them, so far did his throw out-distance those of the others.
The talon emerged, clutching ready for action a six-pound iron quoit.
Simultaneously Slim reached for his quoit, and Whiskers and Fatty for their rocks.
Well then, if he be mad, as he is, and with a madness that mostly takes one thing for another, and white for black, and black for white, as was seen when he said the windmills were giants, and the monks' mules dromedaries, flocks of sheep armies of enemies, and much more to the same tune, it will not be very hard to make him believe that some country girl, the first I come across here, is the lady Dulcinea; and if he does not believe it, I'll swear it; and if he should swear, I'll swear again; and if he persists I'll persist still more, so as, come what may, to have my quoit always over the peg.
Let me play at quoits with cyclonic gales, flinging the discs of spinning cloud and whirling air from one end of my dismal kingdom to the other: over the Great Banks or along the edges of pack-ice - this one with true aim right into the bight of the Bay of Biscay, that other upon the fiords of Norway, across the North Sea where the fishermen of many nations look watchfully into my angry eye.
The younger ones occupied themselves as before, some playing cards (there was plenty of money, though there was no food), some with more innocent games, such as quoits and skittles.
His Majesty then dismissed Jellia Jamb and the Soldier with the Green Whiskers, and when they were gone he took his new friend by the arm and led him into the courtyard to play a game of quoits.
Two days later, as the steamer Mariposa plied her customary route between Tahiti and San Francisco, the passengers ceased playing deck quoits, abandoned their card games in the smoker, their novels and deck chairs, and crowded the rail to stare at the small boat that skimmed to them across the sea before a light following breeze.
You can get ten to join a game, or climb a tree, or swim a stream, when there's a chance of breaking their limbs or getting drowned, for one who'll stay on level ground, or in his depth, or play quoits or bowls.
Then an Akali, a wild-eyed, wild-haired Sikh devotee in the blue-checked clothes of his faith, with polished-steel quoits glistening on the cone of his tall blue turban, stalked past, returning from a visit to one of the independent Sikh States, where he had been singing the ancient glories of the Khalsa to College-trained princelings in top-boots and white-cord breeches.
Scouse scally Nige and Geordie charmer Kai Humphries share headline duties at Big Mouth's brand new gigs at Redcar's Coatham Memorial Hall and Guisborough Quoit Club on Friday, May 2, before nipping over to Middlesbrough Town Hall Crypt and Saltburn's Spa Hotel on Saturday, May 3.