quoits


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quoit

 (kwoit, koit)
n.
1. quoits(used with a sing. verb) A game in which players toss rings of metal, rope, or rubber at a stake, trying to get each ring to land with the stake through its center or close to the stake.
2. One of the rings used in this game.

[Middle English coyte, flat stone, quoit, from Old French coilte, coite, from Latin culcita, cushion.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

quoits

(kɔɪts)
pl n
(Games, other than specified) (usually functioning as singular) a game in which quoits are tossed at a stake in the ground in attempts to encircle it
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quoits - a game in which iron rings (or open iron rings) are thrown at a stake in the ground in the hope of encircling itquoits - a game in which iron rings (or open iron rings) are thrown at a stake in the ground in the hope of encircling it
leaner - (horseshoes) the throw of a horseshoe so as to lean against (but not encircle) the stake
ringer - (horseshoes) the successful throw of a horseshoe or quoit so as to encircle a stake or peg
outdoor game - an athletic game that is played outdoors
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
kroužky
ringspil
karikadobó játék
kasthringaleikur
žiedų mėtymas į taikinius
gredzenu mešana uz mērķi
hádzanie krúžkov na kolík
halka oyunu

quoits

[ˈkɔɪts] npljeu m du palet
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

quoits

n singWurfringspiel nt; to play quoitsWurfring spielen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

quoits

(koits) , ((American) kwoits) noun singular
a game in which rings of metal, rope etc, called quoits, are thrown on to one or more small rods or hooks.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Let me play at quoits with cyclonic gales, flinging the discs of spinning cloud and whirling air from one end of my dismal kingdom to the other: over the Great Banks or along the edges of pack-ice - this one with true aim right into the bight of the Bay of Biscay, that other upon the fiords of Norway, across the North Sea where the fishermen of many nations look watchfully into my angry eye.
The younger ones occupied themselves as before, some playing cards (there was plenty of money, though there was no food), some with more innocent games, such as quoits and skittles.
His Majesty then dismissed Jellia Jamb and the Soldier with the Green Whiskers, and when they were gone he took his new friend by the arm and led him into the courtyard to play a game of quoits.
Two days later, as the steamer Mariposa plied her customary route between Tahiti and San Francisco, the passengers ceased playing deck quoits, abandoned their card games in the smoker, their novels and deck chairs, and crowded the rail to stare at the small boat that skimmed to them across the sea before a light following breeze.
You can get ten to join a game, or climb a tree, or swim a stream, when there's a chance of breaking their limbs or getting drowned, for one who'll stay on level ground, or in his depth, or play quoits or bowls.
Quoits had been brought along, and for a while these were pitched with zest.
Then an Akali, a wild-eyed, wild-haired Sikh devotee in the blue-checked clothes of his faith, with polished-steel quoits glistening on the cone of his tall blue turban, stalked past, returning from a visit to one of the independent Sikh States, where he had been singing the ancient glories of the Khalsa to College-trained princelings in top-boots and white-cord breeches.
Achilles next offered the massive iron quoit which mighty Eetion had erewhile been used to hurl, until Achilles had slain him and carried it off in his ships along with other spoils.
They stood up one after the other and Epeus took the quoit, whirled it, and flung it from him, which set all the Achaeans laughing.
The talon emerged, clutching ready for action a six-pound iron quoit.
Simultaneously Slim reached for his quoit, and Whiskers and Fatty for their rocks.
You can tell it's the early 80s on another picture snapped at Guisborough Quoits Club with the moustaches on show, as assistant secretary John Moore and fellow members told The Gazette how upset they were that the local town council had opposed plans for two new quoits pitches.