quoth


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quoth

 (kwōth)
tr.v. Archaic
Uttered; said. Used only in the first and third persons, with the subject following: "Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore!'" (Edgar Allan Poe).

[Middle English, from Old English cwǣth, third person sing. past tense of cwethan, to say; see gwet- in Indo-European roots.]

quoth

(kwəʊθ)
vb
archaic (used with all pronouns except: thou and you, and with nouns) another word for said12
[Old English cwæth, third person singular of cwethan to say; related to Old Frisian quetha to say, Old Saxon, Old High German quethan; see bequeath]

quoth

(kwoʊθ)

v. Archaic.
said (used with nouns, and with first- and third-person pronouns, and always placed before the subject): Quoth the raven, “Nevermore.” (E.A. Poe)
[1150–1200; Middle English quethen, Old English cwethan to say, c. Old High German quedan, Old Norse kuetha, Gothic qithan]
Translations

quoth

(archaic) [kwəʊθ] VI quoth Idije yo
quoth hedijo él

quoth

defective vb (obs, hum)sagte, sprach (liter)

quoth

[kwəʊθ] vt quoth hedisse
References in classic literature ?
"Now," quoth Robin, "will I go too, for fain would I draw a string for the bright eyes of my lass and a butt of good October brewing." So up he got and took his good stout yew bow and a score or more of broad clothyard arrows, and started off from Locksley Town through Sherwood Forest to Nottingham.
"Now," quoth he, "my bow and eke mine arrows are as good as shine; and moreover, I go to the shooting match at Nottingham Town, which same has been proclaimed by our good Sheriff of Nottinghamshire; there I will shoot with other stout yeomen, for a prize has been offered of a fine butt of ale."
"I'll hold the best of you twenty marks," quoth bold Robin, "that I hit the clout at threescore rods, by the good help of Our Lady fair."
"You have but changed from one white company to the other," quoth Aylward.
"Aye, and it is a road that I know as I know the Midhurst parish butts," quoth the bowman.
`I think, young sir,' quoth he softly, looking into the other's eyes, `that now that I am nearer you will very clearly see that the glove is not an archer's glove.' `Perchance not,' said the Sieur de Crespigny with a twitching lip.
Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling, By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore, "Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou," I said, "art sure no craven, Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the Nightly shore -- Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!" Quoth the raven "Nevermore."
"Wretch," I cried, "thy God hath lent thee -- by these angels he hath sent thee Respite -- respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore; Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe and forget this lost Lenore!" Quoth the raven, "Nevermore."
-- tell me -- tell me, I implore!" Quoth the raven, "Nevermore."
Then the ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling, By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore, "Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou," I said, "art sure no craven, Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore-- Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!" Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."
"Prophet!" said I, "thing of evil!--prophet still, if bird or devil!-- Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore, Desolate, yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted-- On this home by Horror haunted--tell me truly, I implore-- Is there--is there balm in Gilead?--tell me--tell me, I implore!" Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."
ho!" quoth he, "that's for me," and soon rooted it out from beneath the straw.