quoth


Also found in: Wikipedia.

quoth

 (kwōth)
tr.v. Archaic
Uttered; said. Used only in the first and third persons, with the subject following: "Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore!'" (Edgar Allan Poe).

[Middle English, from Old English cwǣth, third person sing. past tense of cwethan, to say; see gwet- in Indo-European roots.]

quoth

(kwəʊθ)
vb
archaic (used with all pronouns except: thou and you, and with nouns) another word for said12
[Old English cwæth, third person singular of cwethan to say; related to Old Frisian quetha to say, Old Saxon, Old High German quethan; see bequeath]

quoth

(kwoʊθ)

v. Archaic.
said (used with nouns, and with first- and third-person pronouns, and always placed before the subject): Quoth the raven, “Nevermore.” (E.A. Poe)
[1150–1200; Middle English quethen, Old English cwethan to say, c. Old High German quedan, Old Norse kuetha, Gothic qithan]
Translations

quoth

(archaic) [kwəʊθ] VI quoth Idije yo
quoth hedijo él

quoth

defective vb (obs, hum)sagte, sprach (liter)

quoth

[kwəʊθ] vt quoth hedisse
References in classic literature ?
Now," quoth Robin, "will I go too, for fain would I draw a string for the bright eyes of my lass and a butt of good October brewing.
Now," quoth he, "my bow and eke mine arrows are as good as shine; and moreover, I go to the shooting match at Nottingham Town, which same has been proclaimed by our good Sheriff of Nottinghamshire; there I will shoot with other stout yeomen, for a prize has been offered of a fine butt of ale.
I'll hold the best of you twenty marks," quoth bold Robin, "that I hit the clout at threescore rods, by the good help of Our Lady fair.
Now stand thou back," quoth Robin, "and let the better man cross first.
That will we presently see," quoth Robin, "and meanwhile stand thou where thou art, or else, by the bright brow of Saint AElfrida, I will show thee right good Nottingham play with a clothyard shaft betwixt thy ribs.
Now," quoth the stranger, "I will tan thy hide till it be as many colors as a beggar's cloak, if thou darest so much as touch a string of that same bow that thou holdest in thy hands.
You have but changed from one white company to the other," quoth Aylward.
Aye, and it is a road that I know as I know the Midhurst parish butts," quoth the bowman.
I think, young sir,' quoth he softly, looking into the other's eyes, `that now that I am nearer you will very clearly see that the glove is not an archer's glove.
And in every way such a glove as might be worn by the fairest and sweetest lady in England,' quoth the Englishman.
he is our master, Michel," quoth Aylward, "and such men as we do not serve under a laggart.
quoth he, "that's for me," and soon rooted it out from beneath the straw.