raccoon

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rac·coon

also ra·coon  (ră-ko͞on′)
n. pl. rac·coons or raccoon also ra·coons or racoon
1. An omnivorous mammal (Procyon lotor) native to the Americas and introduced elsewhere, having grayish-brown fur, black masklike facial markings, and a black-ringed bushy tail.
2. The fur of this mammal.
3. Any of various similar or related animals.

[Of Virginia Algonquian origin.]

raccoon

(rəˈkuːn) or

racoon

n, pl -coons or -coon
1. (Animals) any omnivorous mammal of the genus Procyon, esp P. lotor (North American raccoon), inhabiting forests of North and Central America and the Caribbean: family Procyonidae, order Carnivora (carnivores). Raccoons have a pointed muzzle, long tail, and greyish-black fur with black bands around the tail and across the face
2. (Textiles) the fur of the North American raccoon
[C17: from Algonquian ärähkun, from ärähkuněm he scratches with his hands]

rac•coon

(ræˈkun)

n., pl. -coons, (esp. collectively) -coon.
1. any small, nocturnal carnivore of the genus Procyon, esp. P. lotor, having a masklike black stripe across the eyes and a bushy, ringed tail, native to North and Central America.
2. the thick, brownish gray fur of this animal.
[1608, Amer.; < Virginia Algonquian aroughcun]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.raccoon - the fur of the North American racoonraccoon - the fur of the North American racoon
fur, pelt - the dressed hairy coat of a mammal
2.raccoon - an omnivorous nocturnal mammal native to North America and Central Americaraccoon - an omnivorous nocturnal mammal native to North America and Central America
procyonid - plantigrade carnivorous mammals
genus Procyon, Procyon - the type genus of the family Procyonidae: raccoons
crab-eating raccoon, Procyon cancrivorus - a South American raccoon
Translations
mýval
vaskebjørn
pesukarhu
rakun
mosómedve
rakun
òvottabjörn
アライグマ
너구리
meškėnas
jenots
medvedík čistotný
rakun
tvättbjörn
แรคคูน
gấu trúc Mỹ

raccoon

[rəˈkuːn] N (raccoon or raccoons (pl)) → mapache m

raccoon

racoon [rəˈkuːn] nraton m laveur

raccoon

[rəˈkuːn] nprocione m, orsetto lavatore

raccoon,

racoon

(rəˈkuːn) , ((American) rӕ-) noun
a type of small, furry, North American animal, with a striped, bushy tail.

raccoon

راكُون mýval vaskebjørn Waschbär ρακούν mapache pesukarhu raton laveur rakun procione アライグマ 너구리 wasbeer vaskebjørn szop guaxinim, racum енот tvättbjörn แรคคูน rakun gấu trúc Mỹ 浣熊

raccoon

n mapache m
References in periodicals archive ?
Another isolated case of raccoon rabies was reported in 2015 at the border with New York in southwestern Quebec (7).
Since 2003, Wildlife Services has been working to eliminate raccoon rabies from northern Maine because the virus poses a threat to human and animal health.
Evaltion of an oral vaccination program to control raccoon rabies in a suburbanized landscape.
Raccoon rabies virus variant transmission through solid organ transplantation.
The proportions of individual raccoons involved in dispersal and philopatry are of special interest to researchers because of the effects on the speed of the spread of epidemics such as raccoon rabies, the largest epizootic on record (Cullingham et al.
Raccoon rabies is widespread on the Eastern Seaboard.
For example, raccoon rabies in the states of the US eastern seaboard has been slowly moving westward.
These patterns and observed long-range dispersal may speed the spread of diseases like raccoon rabies.
In the past 20 years, vaccine baiting has been quite effective in rapidly limiting outbreaks (called "epizootics," the animal equivalent of epidemics) of raccoon rabies in Ontario and some parts of Florida; of coyote and dog rabies in South Texas; and of fox rabies in many parts of Europe.
He noted that the town is experiencing a significant increase in raccoon rabies.
In the mid-1970s, a new strain of raccoon rabies started spreading throughout the eastern United States.
The epizootic front of raccoon rabies that started in West Virginia in 1977 has now advanced southward into North Carolina, northward into Maine and across the Canadian border, and westward into Eastern Ohio.