raccoon

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rac·coon

also ra·coon  (ră-ko͞on′)
n. pl. rac·coons or raccoon also ra·coons or racoon
1. An omnivorous mammal (Procyon lotor) native to the Americas and introduced elsewhere, having grayish-brown fur, black masklike facial markings, and a black-ringed bushy tail.
2. The fur of this mammal.
3. Any of various similar or related animals.

[Of Virginia Algonquian origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

raccoon

(rəˈkuːn) or

racoon

n, pl -coons or -coon
1. (Animals) any omnivorous mammal of the genus Procyon, esp P. lotor (North American raccoon), inhabiting forests of North and Central America and the Caribbean: family Procyonidae, order Carnivora (carnivores). Raccoons have a pointed muzzle, long tail, and greyish-black fur with black bands around the tail and across the face
2. (Textiles) the fur of the North American raccoon
[C17: from Algonquian ärähkun, from ärähkuněm he scratches with his hands]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rac•coon

(ræˈkun)

n., pl. -coons, (esp. collectively) -coon.
1. any small, nocturnal carnivore of the genus Procyon, esp. P. lotor, having a masklike black stripe across the eyes and a bushy, ringed tail, native to North and Central America.
2. the thick, brownish gray fur of this animal.
[1608, Amer.; < Virginia Algonquian aroughcun]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.raccoon - the fur of the North American racoonraccoon - the fur of the North American racoon
fur, pelt - the dressed hairy coat of a mammal
2.raccoon - an omnivorous nocturnal mammal native to North America and Central Americaraccoon - an omnivorous nocturnal mammal native to North America and Central America
procyonid - plantigrade carnivorous mammals
genus Procyon, Procyon - the type genus of the family Procyonidae: raccoons
crab-eating raccoon, Procyon cancrivorus - a South American raccoon
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
mýval
vaskebjørn
pesukarhu
rakun
mosómedve
rakun
òvottabjörn
アライグマ
너구리
meškėnas
jenots
medvedík čistotný
rakun
tvättbjörn
แรคคูน
gấu trúc Mỹ

raccoon

[rəˈkuːn] N (raccoon or raccoons (pl)) → mapache m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

raccoon

racoon [rəˈkuːn] nraton m laveur
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

raccoon

[rəˈkuːn] nprocione m, orsetto lavatore
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

raccoon,

racoon

(rəˈkuːn) , ((American) rӕ-) noun
a type of small, furry, North American animal, with a striped, bushy tail.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

raccoon

راكُون mýval vaskebjørn Waschbär ρακούν mapache pesukarhu raton laveur rakun procione アライグマ 너구리 wasbeer vaskebjørn szop guaxinim, racum енот tvättbjörn แรคคูน rakun gấu trúc Mỹ 浣熊
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

raccoon

n mapache m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Neither were the schooner captains believed when they reported seeing, on cold winter mornings, a man swimming in the tide-rips of Raccoon Straits or in the swift currents between Goat island and Angel Island miles from shore.
The coat in itself was a very good one, it kept me warm; but it was wadded and it had a raccoon collar which was the height of vulgarity.
From Commodore Porter he received the alarming intelligence that the British frigate Phoebe, with a store-ship mounted with battering pieces, calculated to attack forts, had arrived at Rio Janeiro, where she had been joined by the sloops of war Cherub and Raccoon, and that they had all sailed in company on the 6th of July for the Pacific, bound, as it was supposed, to Columbia River.
I formerly saw the raccoon in the woods behind where my house is built, and probably still heard their whinnering at night.
"I SEE quite a number of rings on your tail," said an Alderman to a Raccoon that he met in a zoological garden.
"Yes," replied the Raccoon, "and I hear quite a number of tales on your ring."
Raccoons, which are omnivorous, live around two to three years in the wild.
Raccoons might not be getting stuck in sewer grates every day in Newton, but Fricke said the fire department has gotten its share of odd calls about animals in need of help.
Raccoons come running for food as piped piper serenades them with Native American Flute
Raccoons are native to southern Canada, most of the United States, Central America and northern parts of South America.
More than two dozen raccoons have died in a viral outbreak of an infectious disease that makes them act like "zombies"&nbsp;since June 24 in Central Park, New York.
Everyday people and raccoons share a single ritual: