race-bait

race-bait

also race·bait (rās′bāt′)
v. race-bait·ed, race-bait·ing, race-baits also race·bait·ed or race·bait·ing or race·baits
intr.v.
To arouse the prejudice or fears of one racial group regarding another, especially as a political tactic.
tr.v.
1. To attack (another) on racial grounds, as for being a racist or for inciting racial prejudice.
2. To arouse the prejudices or fears of (one racial group) regarding another.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Aussie prime minister, for example, can put a cameo in up north in a vulnerable Aboriginal community , while one or two of his ministers eagerly race-bait against other marginalised, at-risk peoples in the south.
We are not prepared to surrender to another era of race-bait politics, or to send poor women back to the alleys for abortions, or to lay waste our environment in the interest of big oil.
Gore was the vehicle through which he could race-bait Jackson and (he thought) solidify his Jewish support.
(The surviving Kennedy brother would rather have us forget that in 1960 John and Robert Kennedy race-baited not only blacks but also whites, by handing out palm cards to the latter with pictures showing Richard Nixon smiling with black children.) Thus, 1960 serves as a good, final electoral benchmark for two-party support prior to the civil rights era.
In the second paragraph, the text should have read "race-baited Jesse Jackson" (instead of Jesse Helms) and the last sentence of paragraph three should have read "proponent of adult punishments for juvenile offenders."
It was also Gore who race-baited Jesse Helms with dubious charges of anti-Semitism.
Whether it's Jesse Helms's campaign ads, or the way they manipulated the Haiti issue or the South Africa issue, they have race-baited for so long that sometimes I think they believe their own clippings about developing some schemes to punish blacks to the extent that it will excite whites.
It was unclear whether Cohen thought Texaco had been race-baited into the sort of public obloquy that would leave its board with no alternative but to seek merger with another oil company of better reputation.