racial profiling


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racial profiling

n.
The use of a generalized suspicion based on race rather than evidence specific to the individual in policing and law enforcement activities.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

racial profiling

n
(Law) government activity directed at a suspect or group of suspects based solely on race
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.racial profiling - a form of racism consisting of the (alleged) policy of policemen who stop and search vehicles driven by persons belonging to particular racial groups
racial discrimination, racialism, racism - discriminatory or abusive behavior towards members of another race
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
But even if there is a systemic quality to police abuse and to the use of race, Risse and Zeckhauser imply, it does not follow that racial profiling is unjustified, even though it will then be likely that police abuse and the misuse of race in policing will infect racial profiling.
Schwartz said she answered that it smacked of racial profiling to her.
As the flight took off he was left stranded blaming American authorities for 'racial profiling.'
"I guess I just meet the profile They told me they weren't taking any passengers on stand-by but deep down I think it was racial profiling. It's really demoralising," he said.
"I thought it was racial profiling," said 16-year-old Kat Nordgren.
Until racial profiling becomes a part of your daily existence--a prevailing, perennial expectation--there is no understanding it, really.
The phenomenon of racial profiling in Ontario has long been acknowledged by members of racialized communities, progressive activists, and others--but official acknowledgment was always withheld.
The report provides demographic characteristics of residents involved in traffic stops and use-of-force encounters and discusses the survey findings' relevance to the issue of racial profiling. Highlights include the following: about 25 percent of the 45.3 million persons with a face-to-face contact indicated that the reason was to report a crime or other problem; in 2002, about 1.3 million residents age 16 or older--2.9 percent of the 45.3 million persons analyzed--were arrested by police; and the likelihood of being stopped by officers in 2002 did not differ significantly among drivers of different races, although police were more likely to carry out some type of search on an African-American or Hispanic driver than a Caucasian.
Richard Banks's Beyond Profiling: Race, Policing, and the Drug War, which criticizes the current debate over racial profiling for focusing too much on profiling's alleged irrationality.
Each presents their own stories of experiences with teens; from handling sexual issues to racial profiling, drinking parties and more.
By Hussein Ibish Racial profiling is a long-discredited American law-enforcement technique whereby police identify individuals as suspects based on their apparent race, ethnicity, age, and other simple identity criteria.