racked


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rack 1

 (răk)
n.
1.
a. A framework or stand in or on which to hold, hang, or display various articles: a trophy rack; a rack for baseball bats in the dugout; a drying rack for laundry.
b. Games A triangular frame for arranging billiard or pool balls at the start of a game.
c. A receptacle for livestock feed.
d. A frame for holding bombs in an aircraft.
2. Slang
a. A bunk or bed.
b. Sleep: tried to get some rack.
3. A toothed bar that meshes with a gearwheel, pinion, or other toothed machine part.
4.
a. A state of intense anguish.
b. A cause of intense anguish.
5. An instrument of torture on which the victim's body was stretched.
6. A pair of antlers.
7. Vulgar Slang A woman's breasts.
tr.v. racked, rack·ing, racks
1. To place (billiard balls, for example) in a rack.
2. also wrack To cause great physical or mental suffering to: Pain racked his entire body. See Synonyms at afflict.
3. To torture by means of the rack.
Phrasal Verbs:
rack out Slang
To go to sleep or get some sleep.
rack up Informal
To accumulate or score: rack up points.
Idioms:
off the rack
Ready-made. Used of clothing.
on the rack
Under great stress.
rack (one's) brains/brain
To try hard to remember or think of something.

[Middle English rakke, probably from Middle Dutch rec, framework; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

rack′er n.

rack 2

 (răk)
n.
A fast, flashy, four-beat gait of a horse in which each foot touches the ground separately and at equal intervals.
intr.v. racked, rack·ing, racks
To go or move at a rack.

[Origin unknown.]

rack 3

also wrack  (răk)
n.
A thin mass of wind-driven clouds.

[Middle English rak, probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Swedish rak, wreckage.]

rack 4

 (răk)
n.
Variant of wrack1.

rack 5

 (răk)
n. & v.
Variant of wrack2.

rack 6

 (răk)
tr.v. racked, rack·ing, racks
To drain (wine or cider) from the dregs.

[Middle English rakken, from Old Provençal arracar, from raca, stems and husks of grapes.]

rack 7

 (răk)
n.
1.
a. A wholesale rib cut of lamb or veal between the shoulder and the loin.
b. A retail rib cut of lamb or veal, prepared for roasting or for rib chops.
2. The neck and upper spine of mutton, pork, or veal.

[Probably from rack.]

wrack 1

also rack  (răk)
n.
Destruction or ruin. Used chiefly in the phrase wrack and ruin.

[Middle English, from Old English wræc, punishment (influenced by Middle Dutch wrak, shipwreck).]

wrack 2

also rack  (răk)
n.
1.
a. Wreckage, especially of a ship cast ashore.
b. Chiefly British Violent destruction of a building or vehicle.
2.
a. Seaweed that has been cast ashore or dried.
b. Any of various brown algae, especially rockweed or kelp.
v. wracked, wrack·ing, wracks also racked or rack·ing or racks
v.tr.
To cause the ruin of; wreck.
v.intr.
To be wrecked.

[Middle English wrak, from Middle Dutch.]

wrack 3

 (răk)
tr.v. wracked, wrack·ing, wracks
Variant of rack1..
Idiom:
wrack (one's) brains/brain
To try hard to remember or think of something.

[Influenced by wrack.]

wrack 4

 (răk)
n.
Variant of rack3.

racked

Fifteen balls arranged in a triangle at the foot spot.
References in classic literature ?
It certainly had been very pleasant to enjoy the spontaneous and chivalrous homage of these men, with no further suggestion of recompense or responsibility than the permission to be worshipped; but beyond that she racked her brain in vain to recall any look or act that proclaimed the lover.
Jurgis could see all the truth now--could see himself, through the whole long course of events, the victim of ravenous vultures that had torn into his vitals and devoured him; of fiends that had racked and tortured him, mocking him, meantime, jeering in his face.
Tom Sawyer racked the head off of himself all that month trying to plan some way out for Uncle Silas, and many's the night he kept me up 'most all night with this kind of tiresome work, but he couldn't seem to get on the right track no way.
And, to cap the climax of their base ingratitude and fiendish barbarity, my grandmother, who was now very old, having outlived my old master and all his children, having seen the beginning and end of all of them, and her present owners finding she was of but little value, her frame already racked with the pains of old age, and complete helplessness fast stealing over her once active limbs, they took her to the woods, built her a little hut, put up a little mud-chimney, and then made her welcome to the privilege of support- ing herself there in perfect loneliness; thus virtually turning her out to die
This state of things should have been to me a paradise of peace, accustomed as I was to a life of ceaseless reprimand and thankless fagging; but, in fact, my racked nerves were now in such a state that no calm could soothe, and no pleasure excite them agreeably.