radiative


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ra·di·a·tion

 (rā′dē-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of radiating: the radiation of heat and light from a fire.
2. Physics
a. Emission or propagation of energy in the form of waves or particles.
b. Energy radiated or transmitted in the form of waves or particles.
c. A stream of particles or electromagnetic waves emitted by the atoms and molecules of a radioactive substance as a result of nuclear decay.
3.
a. The act of exposing or the condition of being exposed to such energy.
b. The application of such energy, as in medical treatment.
4. Anatomy Radial arrangement of parts, as of a group of nerve fibers connecting different areas of the brain.
5. Adaptive radiation

ra′di·a′tion·al, ra′di·a′tive adj.

radiative

(ˈreɪdɪətɪv) or

radiatory

adj
(General Physics) physics emitting or causing the emission of radiation: a radiative collision.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In this work, the radiative transfer equation in a human biological tissue is described by using a stationary varying refractive index RTE [18, 19]
Radiative transfer models and geometrical optical models are commonly used for modeling the reflectance.
In order to find the maximum power and efficiency at maximum power output, relation between the design parameters of internally and externally radiative heat engines was presented [26].
[13] has presented a model for suspension to wall heat transfer coefficient based on simplified cluster renewal including the effects of radiative heat transfer.
Other topics include three-dimensional dust radiative transfer, the dawn of chemistry, solar irradiance variability and climate, modeling the panchromatic spectral energy distributions of galaxies, and nucleosynthesis in stars and the chemical enrichment of galaxies.
The signals of keystrokes can leak to the ground line of the PS/2 serial due to crosstalk and radiative couplings and these couplings are analyzed firstly.
In the last 20 years, there has been a 30% increase in radiative forcing--the warming effect on the climate--due to carbon dioxide ([CO.sub.2]), methane, and nitrous oxide levels.
In the present study, we investigate the radiative effect of BC aerosols during the year 2010-2011, in which the CWG event had taken place.
AFP last week reported on the draft, which uses a concept known as "radiative forcing" -- how much energy from the sun remains in the atmosphere after some is bounced back into space -- and the substances that effect it.
The authors found that ocean temperature conditions plus high radiative forcing -- when Earth absorbs more sunlight than it radiates back into space -- play important roles in triggering megadroughts.
Radiative Neutron Capture: Primordial Nucleosynthesis of the Universe

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