radicle


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Related to radicle: seed coat

rad·i·cle

 (răd′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. Botany The part of a plant embryo that develops into a root.
2. Anatomy A small structure, such as a fibril of a nerve, that resembles a root.

[Latin rādīcula, diminutive of rādīx, rādīc-, root; see wrād- in Indo-European roots.]

radicle

(ˈrædɪkəl)
n
1. (Botany) botany
a. part of the embryo of seed-bearing plants that develops into the main root
b. a very small root or rootlike part
2. (Anatomy) anatomy any bodily structure resembling a rootlet, esp one of the smallest branches of a vein or nerve
3. (Chemistry) chem a variant spelling of radical11
[C18: from Latin rādīcula a little root, from rādīx root]

rad•i•cle

(ˈræd ɪ kəl)

n.
1. Bot. an embryonic root.
2. Anat. a small rootlike part or structure, as the beginning of a nerve or vein.
[1665–75; < Latin rādīcula small root =rādīc- (s. of rādīx) root1 + -ula -ule]
ra•dic•u•lar (rəˈdɪk yə lər) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radicle - (anatomy) a small structure resembling a rootlet (such as a fibril of a nerve)radicle - (anatomy) a small structure resembling a rootlet (such as a fibril of a nerve)
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
nerve, nervus - any bundle of nerve fibers running to various organs and tissues of the body
anatomy, general anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
Translations

radicle

[ˈrædɪkl] N (Bot) → radícula f (Chem) → radical m

radicle

n (Bot) → Keimwurzel f; (= small root)Würzelchen nt; (Chem) → Radikal nt

radicle

[ˈrædɪkl] n
a. (Bot) → radichetta
b. (Math, Chem) = radical b

rad·i·cle

n. radícula, estructura semejante a una raíz.
References in classic literature ?
The same fact holds good with flowering plants, of which the two main divisions have been founded on characters derived from the embryo,--on the number and position of the embryonic leaves or cotyledons, and on the mode of development of the plumule and radicle.
The soil, it appears, is suited to the seed, for it has sent its radicle downward, and it may now send its shoot upward also with confidence.
Other investors included Ekistic Ventures, Tom Steyers Radicle Impact Partners, former General Motors Co.
For scoring clarity, seeds were considered germinated when the radicle was visible, and germination was recorded every alternate day for 30 days.
After 40 days of sowing, the chestnuts were removed from the rooting bed in order to quantify the following: germination percentage, with germination being defined by the presence of radicle protrusion; emergence percentage, with emergence being defined as the presence of sprout emissions; and taproot mean length, which was measured with the assistance of a digital pachymeter.
In the light of the present result it is inferred that methanolic extract of Erythraea ramosissima can be used as a free radicle scavenger and as an anticancer agent.
Anincrease in germination with priming technique application can bedue to various factors such as the initiation of metabolic processes, prevention ofchromosomal damage and induction of nuclear DNA synthesis in radicle tip cells[5].
2013), at a magnetic field of 50 mT, the root length, radicle length and weight of radicle increases.
1 MPa, there was higher percentage of normal seedlings than in the control, which can be explained as a probable control of imbibition, which acts as an osmotic regulator and thus allows physiological activities, such as the accumulation of sugars, organic acids and ions, activating the initial metabolism and, consequently, the radicle protrusion (Santos et al.
According to data analysis, significant differences were observed between treatments (Table 1 and 2), except for panicle length (PL), coleoptile length (CL) and radicle length (RL).
When the radicle reached up 2 mm length, the seed was considered germinated (ISTA, 1985).