radicle


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Related to radicle: seed coat

rad·i·cle

 (răd′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. Botany The part of a plant embryo that develops into a root.
2. Anatomy A small structure, such as a fibril of a nerve, that resembles a root.

[Latin rādīcula, diminutive of rādīx, rādīc-, root; see wrād- in Indo-European roots.]

radicle

(ˈrædɪkəl)
n
1. (Botany) botany
a. part of the embryo of seed-bearing plants that develops into the main root
b. a very small root or rootlike part
2. (Anatomy) anatomy any bodily structure resembling a rootlet, esp one of the smallest branches of a vein or nerve
3. (Chemistry) chem a variant spelling of radical11
[C18: from Latin rādīcula a little root, from rādīx root]

rad•i•cle

(ˈræd ɪ kəl)

n.
1. Bot. an embryonic root.
2. Anat. a small rootlike part or structure, as the beginning of a nerve or vein.
[1665–75; < Latin rādīcula small root =rādīc- (s. of rādīx) root1 + -ula -ule]
ra•dic•u•lar (rəˈdɪk yə lər) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radicle - (anatomy) a small structure resembling a rootlet (such as a fibril of a nerve)radicle - (anatomy) a small structure resembling a rootlet (such as a fibril of a nerve)
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
nerve, nervus - any bundle of nerve fibers running to various organs and tissues of the body
anatomy, general anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
Translations

radicle

[ˈrædɪkl] N (Bot) → radícula f (Chem) → radical m

radicle

n (Bot) → Keimwurzel f; (= small root)Würzelchen nt; (Chem) → Radikal nt

radicle

[ˈrædɪkl] n
a. (Bot) → radichetta
b. (Math, Chem) = radical b

rad·i·cle

n. radícula, estructura semejante a una raíz.
References in classic literature ?
The same fact holds good with flowering plants, of which the two main divisions have been founded on characters derived from the embryo,--on the number and position of the embryonic leaves or cotyledons, and on the mode of development of the plumule and radicle. In our discussion on embryology, we shall see why such characters are so valuable, on the view of classification tacitly including the idea of descent.
The soil, it appears, is suited to the seed, for it has sent its radicle downward, and it may now send its shoot upward also with confidence.
In summary, we observed in the present work that the loss of desiccation tolerance in Anadenanthera colubrina seeds begins at the first hours of imbibition and it is complete after radicle protrusion.
According to data analysis, significant differences were observed between treatments (Table 1 and 2), except for panicle length (PL), coleoptile length (CL) and radicle length (RL).
After 10 hours of treatment, the seeds were checked for germination, seedling emergence, plumule length and radicle length etc.
Germination starts with absorption of water, resulting in expansion and elongation of seed embryo and is completed when radicle protrudes from seed covering (Hermann et al., 2007).
Bakhtyary and Hamedy [9] showed that in studying the effects of salinity stress on kidney beans, increasing salinity resulted to signifisant decreasing effect on rate and percentage of germination and also decreased the vegetative traits such as; radicle and plumule length, fresh weight of radicle and plumule, and plumule dry weight.
Although the germination is not completed, metabolic activities that prepare seeds for radicle protrusion may be initiated during priming [4, 5].
oleifera hybrid embryos displayed no significant differences in average values observed for shoot emergence per experimental unit under distinct glucose treatments (n = 45, F = 2.337, p = 0.115) but significantly higher averages (n = 45, F = 13.742, p < 0.001 and Tukey, p < 0.05) were observed for radicle emergence under glucose 20 (110mM) and 30g/L (165mM) (Table 1).
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