radio deception


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radio deception

The employment of radio to deceive the enemy. Radio deception includes sending false dispatches, using deceptive headings, employing enemy call signs, etc. See also electronic warfare.
References in periodicals archive ?
(81.) For example, Allied radio deception during World War II was centrally controlled by theater commanders and overseen by strategic deception-planning staffs in Washington and London.
Technical parts of the radio deception and silence plan (the latter known as "denial" in modern military parlance) were executed in such a manner as to leave the American naval radio and fleet intelligence officers swaying between uncertainty as to the location of the Imperial Japanese Navy's carriers and conviction that these ships had remained in home waters in accordance with traditional Japanese doctrine and decades of exercises.
Some claim that the Striking Force did not maintain complete radio silence or that Tokyo's radio deception failed to fool the Americans.
In statements and writings after Pearl Harbor, both officers insisted that the Japanese, though sailing in complete radio silence, could not have pulled off a successful radio deception against the U.S.
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