radio detection


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Related to radio detection: radio detection and ranging

radio detection

The detection of the presence of an object by radio-location without precise determination of its position.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the name suggests, automotive radar (Radio Detection and Ranging) uses radio waves for object detection, which has been valuable in designing of semi-automated, assisted-driving, self-driving, and conditionally automated vehicles functioning within different frequency ranges.
1935: Radar (Radio Detection and Ranging) was first demonstrated in Daventry by Robert Watson-Watt.
* Sensor fusions with radio detection and ranging (radar), light detection and ranging (lidar), and optical sensors (cameras).
The VLA observations provided both the first radio detection and the first measurement of the magnetic field of a possible planetary mass object beyond our Solar System.
However, it is worth refreshing oneself by knowing that "laser," which in its early days was written with all caps like acronyms generally are, stands for "Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation" and "radar" "Radio Detection and Ranging." (Presumably, LiDAR will, when it becomes an even greater part of the daily parlance, will simply become "lidar."
Radar, an acronym for radio detection and ranging, is the process of pointing a narrowly focused radio antenna at a known azimuth and tilt ("elevation" whenever we are talking about radar), transmitting a radio energy pulse, and measuring how long it takes for reflected energy from a target to come back.
Radar, an acronym for radio detection and ranging, is an object detection system which fires electromagnetic wave into the surrounding environment, then receives and processes its echo signal reflected, so as to determine the range, range rate and angle of objects.
Radar was originally called Radio Detection and Ranging, but the U.S.
Barbara explained that the history of ultrasound as a therapeutic tool dates back to the development of what was known in the second world war as SONAR (originally an acronym for SOund Navigation And Ranging) that became the underwater navigation and detection equivalent of RADAR (an acronym for RAdio Detection And Ranging).
New advances in radio detection and ranging technology have led to a wide variety of different applications: this book discusses its adaptation to new markets and offers keys to scenarios, requirements and limitations alike, making it a key acquisition for any engineering collection strong in radar technology.

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