radioactive decay


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to radioactive decay: alpha decay, half life, radioactivity

radioactive decay

n.
1. Spontaneous disintegration of a radionuclide with the emission of energetic particles or radiation, such as alpha or beta particles or gamma rays.
2. An instance of such disintegration.

radioactive decay

n
(Nuclear Physics) disintegration of a nucleus that occurs spontaneously or as a result of electron capture. One or more different nuclei are formed and usually particles and gamma rays are emitted. Sometimes shortened to: decay Also called: disintegration

ra·di·o·ac·tive decay

(rā′dē-ō-ăk′tĭv)
The spontaneous breakdown of a radioactive nucleus into a lighter nucleus. Radioactive decay causes the release of radiation in the form of alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays. The end result of radioactive decay is the creation of a stable atomic nucleus.

radioactive decay

The decrease in the radiation intensity of any radioactive material with respect to time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radioactive decay - the spontaneous disintegration of a radioactive substance along with the emission of ionizing radiation
alpha decay - radioactive decay of an atomic nucleus that is accompanied by the emission of an alpha particle
beta decay - radioactive decay of an atomic nucleus that is accompanied by the emission of a beta particle
nuclear reaction - (physics) a process that alters the energy or structure or composition of atomic nuclei
Translations
décroissance radioactive
radioaktivt sönderfall
References in periodicals archive ?
The radioactive decay of hafnium-182 and tungsten-182 continued only during the first 70 million years of the existence of the solar system.
It contains five lesson plans on debates about the safety and efficiency of nuclear energy, particularly nuclear fission and the process of radioactive decay, the history and societal implications of using nuclear energy as a power source, and nuclear fusion and its potential as an energy source.
XENON1T, the underground laboratory's dark matter detector captured the radioactive decay of xenon-124, a process believed to be one trillion times longer than the life of the universe.
All three are stable and non-radioactive, but neon-21 is formed by radioactive decay of uranium.
This technology significantly reduces the release of radium and its radioactive decay product radon to the atmosphere, and as a result lowers the costs of handling and disposal of radioactive waste in oil and gas exploration.
Radon is a colourless, odourless radioactive gas formed by the radioactive decay of the small amounts of uranium that occur naturally in all rocks and soils.
It takes a unique approach of comparing raw carbon-14 data (no use of calibration curves) with tree-ring counts back to 14,000 years (most from Europe), and annual sediment layer (varve) counts covering 50,000 years of sediment deposition in Lake Suigetsu, Japan, to show how assumptions such as constant radioactive decay rates, annual growth of tree rings, and annual deposition of layered sediments can be tested and verified.
In 1913, Henry Moseley invented the first power generator based on radioactive decay. His nuclear battery consisted of a glass sphere silvered on the inside with a radium emitter mounted at the center on an isolated electrode.
Bayer's team periodically extracts the Ra-223 that grows into the ORNL-supplied Ac-227, via radioactive decay process, and ships it around the world for immediate use as a cancer therapy.
The first phase and the third one are missed when one considers the radioactive decay law only.
The fuel is highly radioactive and continues to produce a large amount of heat through radioactive decay, called decay heat, after its removal.'