radiobiologist


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Related to radiobiologist: radiation biology, radiobiological

ra·di·o·bi·ol·o·gy

 (rā′dē-ō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The study of the effects of radiation on living organisms.
2. The use of radioactive tracers to study biological processes.

ra′di·o·bi′o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ra′di·o·bi·ol′o·gist n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radiobiologist - a biologist who studies the effects of radiation on living organisms
biologist, life scientist - (biology) a scientist who studies living organisms
Louis Harold Gray, Gray - English radiobiologist in whose honor the gray (the SI unit of energy for the absorbed dose of radiation) was named (1905-1965)
References in periodicals archive ?
Orient calls it "implausible"; Jaworowski says it's "absurd"; and in 1995, renowned Swedish radiobiologist Gunnar Walinder said, "The LNT hypothesis is a primitive, unscientific idea that cannot be justified by current scientific understanding.
The standards are not "conservative." As Swedish radiobiologist Gunnar Walinder stated in 1995, "The LNT hypothesis is a primitive, unscientific idea that cannot be justified by current scientific understanding" Further, "as practiced by the modern radiation protection community, the LNT hypothesis is one of the greatest scientific scandals of our time." Chernobyl victims, Cuttler said, suffered a "psychosis of fear." (15)
Martin, "Abscopal effects of radiation therapy: a clinical review for the radiobiologist," Cancer Letters, 2013.
However Neal Hines, radiobiologist who reviewed the effects of nuclear testing in the region between 1946 and 1961, did warn in July 1956 that 'Rongelap's radioactivity still was at levels at which permanent residence would have been of doubtful wisdom.' (8) Yet AEC and military officials prepared Rongelap for (the first) repatriation, carried out in June 1957.
A gray, a unit named for the pioneering British radiobiologist Louis Harold Gray, is the amount of energy absorbed per mass unit of tissue.
Douple, a radiobiologist who spent more than a decade at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, said there is no evidence yet that the bomb survivors, known in Japanese as hibakusha, suffered epigenetic effects.
"Radiation is very good at breaking DNA strands," says radiobiologist David J.
<pre> Alexandra Miller, a radiobiologist at the US Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute in Bethesda, Maryland has carried out a series of elegant experiments that show that uranium has very serious genetic effects on DNA at low doses.