radiotelegraphy


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ra·di·o·te·leg·ra·phy

 (rā′dē-ō-tə-lĕg′rə-fē)
n.
Telegraphy in which messages are transmitted by radio instead of wire.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

radiotelegraphy

(ˌreɪdɪəʊtɪˈlɛɡrəfɪ)
n
(Telecommunications) a type of telegraphy in which messages (usually in Morse code) are transmitted by radio waves; its use is no longer widespread as it has been superseded by satellite technology. Also called: wireless telegraphy
radiotelegraphic adj
ˌradioˌteleˈgraphically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

radiotelegraphy

1. the transmitting and receiving of messages by radiotelegraph.
2. the science and technology of the radiotelegraph. — radiotelegraphic, adj.
See also: Radio
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radiotelegraphy - telegraphy that uses transmission by radio rather than by wireradiotelegraphy - telegraphy that uses transmission by radio rather than by wire
wireless - transmission by radio waves
2.radiotelegraphy - the use of radio to send telegraphic messages (usually by Morse code)radiotelegraphy - the use of radio to send telegraphic messages (usually by Morse code)
radio, wireless - a communication system based on broadcasting electromagnetic waves
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

radiotelegraphy

[ˌreɪdɪəʊtɪˈlɛgrəfɪ] nradiotelegrafia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
It probably originated in engineering talk of point-to-point wired telephone and radiotelegraphy at the beginning of the 20th century and then entered into the common language of engineers.
Five days later the pair returned to the air and both transmitted and received radio messages, effectively demonstrating the practicality of radiotelegraphy.
With these stations ready in the colonial center and periphery, it seemed the moment had come to inaugurate a regular radiotelegraphy service between the Indies and the Netherlands.
Zelle held a first-class license in radiotelephony, a second-class license in radiotelegraphy, and an extra class license in amateur radio, all from the Federal Communications Commission.