synostosis

(redirected from radioulnar synostosis)
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syn·os·to·sis

 (sĭn′ŏs-tō′sĭs)
n. pl. syn·os·to·ses (-sēz)
The fusion of normally separate skeletal bones.

[syn- + Greek osteon, bone; see ost- in Indo-European roots + -osis.]

syn′os·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

synostosis

(ˌsɪnɒsˈtəʊsɪs)
n
(Anatomy) anatomy the (normal or abnormal) fusion of adjacent bones

syn•os•to•sis

(ˌsɪn ɒˈstoʊ sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
the union of separate bones into a single bone.
[1840–50; contraction of synosteosis]
Translations

syn·os·to·sis

, synosteosis
n. sinostosis, union ósea entre dos huesos adyacentes;
senile ______ senil;
tribacillary ______ tribacilar.
References in periodicals archive ?
In most cases, anomalies including hypertelorism, epicantus, upward-slanting palpebral fissures, clinodactyly in the fifth finger, short nail folds, pes planus, joint laxity, dental problems and radioulnar synostosis have been identified (4, 7).
In two cases of radioulnar posttraumatic synostosis, an excision of radioulnar synostosis and interposition of cadaveric fascia lata graft was performed.
We encountered Complications like Superficial infection (2 Cases), Non-union in 1 Case, Transient Neuroprexia of posterior interosseous nerve in 2 Cases, loosening of screw in 1 case, Radioulnar synostosis in 1 case (Table XV).
One patient developed a radioulnar synostosis (Figure 3) and was reoperated on 9 months after the former surgery, leading to almost complete recovery of the forearm rotation.
The technique was later modified by Morrey and coworkers (25) in 1985 as there was a risk of radioulnar synostosis involved with the ulnar stripping.
On the basis of the successful outcome in this case, surgical excision of the interdiaphyseal callus and interposition of a polypropylene mesh could be a viable option for management of posttraumatic radioulnar synostosis in birds of prey.
Srinath Kamineni, FRCS (Ortho), Bernard F Morrey MD, Proximal radial resection for post- traumatic Radioulnar synostosis.
13) All patients had a return of full strength, and there were no instances of radioulnar synostosis or neurological injuries.
Although the two-incision technique decreased the risk of nerve injury, it led to an increase in radioulnar synostosis, with subsequent loss of forearm rotation.
Radioulnar Synostosis: One patients developed proximal radioulnar synostosis and resulted in poor functional outcome.