rag-and-bone man


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rag-and-bone man

(răg′ənd-bōn′)
n. Chiefly British
A man who sells or collects inexpensive secondhand items and previously worn clothing.

rag-and-bone man

n
(Professions) Brit a man who buys and sells discarded clothing, furniture, etc. Also called: ragman or ragpicker US equivalent: junkman

rag-and-bone man

junkman
Translations

rag-and-bone man

[ˌrægənˈbəʊnmæn] N (rag-and-bone men (pl)) (Brit) → trapero m

rag-and-bone man

[ˌrægəndˈbəʊnˌmæn] n (-men (pl)) → straccivendolo
References in periodicals archive ?
The 53-year-old, who has lived in the area for 50 years, recalls visits from the rag-and-bone man on his horse and cart and days out swimming in the "dirty" canal.
And now Jeff Rawle (Drop The Dead Donkey) and Ed Coleman (Pride) are recreating one of the most successful double acts in British TV history, rag-and-bone man Albert Steptoe and his son Harold.
The novel is set in the spring of 2005 and tells the story of Hadi Al Attag, a rag-and-bone man who lives in a populous district of Baghdad.
David Lomon was a 19-year-old rag-and-bone man in east London when he volunteered to join left-wing forces battling General Francisco Franco's nationalist troops in the 1936-1939 conflict.
Rag-and-bone man Cliff Hodgson, who was 89, lived at his junkyard.
@jamesbrilliant: Selly Oak rag-and-bone man: your van makes quite funny sounds.
IN the 1930s/40s down the docks area, there was a rag-and-bone man with a horse and cart, who cruised the streets of the area plying his trade.
The junk-filled garden, in Monikie, Angus, belongs to Alexander Ewart, who is know as Steptoe after the TV rag-and-bone man. Contractors claimed they were threatened with violence when they cleared his yard last year of 20 skiploads of rubbish and five boats.
'SCRAP' GOLD: This Persian gold cup once acquired by a rag-and-bone man has sold for pounds 50,000
From composting evidence dating as far back as 4000 years ago in China to the age-old tradition of the rag-and-bone man, reuse and recycling was commonplace, even the norm.