ragtime


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rag·time

 (răg′tīm′)
n.
A style of jazz characterized by elaborately syncopated rhythm in the melody and a steadily accented accompaniment.

[From rag.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ragtime

(ˈræɡˌtaɪm)
n
(Jazz) a style of jazz piano music, developed by Scott Joplin around 1900, having a two-four rhythm base and a syncopated melody
[C20: probably from ragged + time]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rag•time

(ˈrægˌtaɪm)

n.
1. rhythm in which the accompaniment is strict two-four time and the melody, with improvised embellishments, is in steady syncopation.
2. music in ragtime rhythm.
[1895–1900]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ragtime

A style of jazz piano playing with a highly syncopated melody, very popular in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It developed out of black minstrel music and was popularized by the pianist and composer Scott Joplin (1868–1917).
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ragtime - music with a syncopated melody (usually for the piano)ragtime - music with a syncopated melody (usually for the piano)
dance music - music to dance to
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ragtime

[ˈrægtaɪm] N (Mus) → ragtime m
in ragtimesincopado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ragtime

[ˈrægtaɪm] n (= music) → ragtime mrag trade n
the rag trade → la confection
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ragtime

[ˈrægˌtaɪm] nragtime m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Of American cocktails he had a fair working knowledge, and he appreciated ragtime. But of the other great American institutions he was completely ignorant.
They sing "Home, Sweet Home" in ragtime; they carry their lares et penates in a bandbox; their vine is entwined about a picture hat; a rubber plant is their fig tree.
There was little opportunity for the spirit of the place to return with its quietude and repose, for the man's voice, raised in ragtime song, still dominated the canyon with possession.
Pianist Jim Omohundro has played jazz and ragtime on a piano located at Casey's Corner for more than 30 years, and five years ago the Zhou family stopped to watch.
The production is directed by Peter Rothstein, the Minneapolis-based artist who also helmed last season's compelling Ragtime at Asolo Rep.
Under the name From Rag Time to Jazz, the quintet will present an evening of jazz and ragtime music to the Paphos crowd on Saturday.
Continue reading "A High School Performance of 'Ragtime' Includes the N-Word, and It's Causing Controversy" at...
Coon songs in the late 1890s often were associated with cakewalks and ragtime, and shortly before World War I ragtime was itself associated with jazz and, to some extent, with blues.
The Ragtime Songbook: Songs of the Ragtime Era by Scott Joplin.
The 12-piece New Century Ragtime Orchestra will be the focus in the Exhibition Hall at 4pm, offering a musical journey from the dawn of ragtime to the early swing era of the 1930s.
The author tells the story of Brun Campbell, one of ragtime's forgotten pioneers.
Rap is likely to take its place in Broadway music but not transform it, because for all of its glories, rap offers more limited dramatic possibilities than ragtime, jazz, or even rock.