raiding


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raid

 (rād)
n.
1. A surprise attack by a small armed force.
2. A sudden forcible entry into a place by police: a raid on a gambling den.
3. An entrance into another's territory for the purpose of seizing goods or valuables.
4. A predatory operation mounted against a competitor, especially an attempt to lure away the personnel or membership of a competing organization.
5. An attempt to seize control of a company, as by acquiring a majority of its stock.
6. An attempt by speculators to drive stock prices down by coordinated selling.
v. raid·ed, raid·ing, raids
v.tr.
To make a raid on.
v.intr.
To conduct a raid or participate in one.

[Scots, raid on horseback, from Middle English rade, from Old English rād, a riding, road; see reidh- in Indo-European roots.]

raid′er n.
Word History: Raid and road both descend from the Old English word rād, which meant primarily "the act of riding" but could also be used specifically to describe an act of riding with hostile intent—that is, a raid. The ai in raid represents the standard development of the Old English vowel ā in Scots and the dialects of northern England, while the oa in road represents the standard development of Old English ā in the dialects of southern England. In the dialects of southern England, road retained its earlier senses of "journey on horseback" and "hostile foray" until the mid-1600s, when the modern sense "public way" became the most common meaning of the word. Later, Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) helped popularize the northern form of the word, raid, through his collections of Scots ballads and his other writings. In the meaning "a military expedition on horseback," raid became part of the general vocabulary of English outside of Scotland and northern England. A trace of the earlier meaning of road, "foray, raid," can still be detected in the compound inroad, literally "a riding or advance into."

raiding

(ˈreɪdɪŋ)
n
the activity of carrying out raids
adj
taking part in a raid
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.raiding - characterized by plundering or pillaging or maraudingraiding - characterized by plundering or pillaging or marauding; "bands of marauding Indians"; "predatory warfare"; "a raiding party"
offensive - for the purpose of attack rather than defense; "offensive weapons"
References in classic literature ?
So he went raiding, after all, and made a nice success of it while everybody was gone to Patsy Cooper's.
It was never tied up save for short intervals, for he was principally engaged in turning it over and over, raiding here, there, and everywhere, a veritable pirate of the financial main.
Here, according to Nicholas's description of the beds and the manner of raiding, it was possible for us to catch the pirates in the act of stealing oysters, and at the same time to get them in our power.
And the worst of it was that there was no ransom that we could pay to satisfy his avidity; for whatever evil is wrought by the raiding East Wind, it is done only to spite his kingly brother of the West.
It was only a foot and a half long, and in my superb ignorance I never dreamed that the club used ashore when raiding the rookeries measured four to five feet.
In raiding and plundering be like fire, is immovability like a mountain.
The raid had resulted in the injuries to one person and registration of a criminal case against a police official of the raiding party.
Hamza himself claimed that NAB violated the Lahore High Court decision by raiding his Model Town residence.
Forces raided al-Jalazoun refugee camp, North of Ramallah, and arrested five Palestinians after raiding their homes, WAFA reported.
Rao Anwar continues to evade the law enforcement agencies raiding cities.
IOF raided Deheisheh camp in the south of Bethlehem City, early this morning, where they arrested Issa Sarasra after raiding his home in Deheisheh Camp in Bethlehem.
Meanwhile, Israeli police detained a Palestinian resident of Silwan in East Jerusalem after raiding his family home.