railbed

railbed

(ˈreɪlˌbɛd)
n
(Railways) railways the ballast layer supporting the sleepers of a railway track
References in classic literature ?
There was no level ground at the Kaltbad station; the railbed was as steep as a roof; I was curious to see how the stop was going to be managed.
The book's first two chapters discuss the river as an Aboriginal portage route, a source of fertile soils, clay, and mechanical energy for settlers, as well as a waste sink and railbed for a rapidly industrializing city.
They already have a railbed so put down the track for a few grand and let's get the railway working for next to nothing.
Chabot said trees and brush from the 66-foot right-of-way will be cleared this winter, and once the frost is out of the ground in the spring, the railbed will be rebuilt as needed, and ties and rails will be laid from the Quabaug Corp.
The railroad itself was a miracle of engineering for its day; its first section crossed the "Million Dollar Bridge" just outside of Cordova and traced the Miles Glacier, where the railbed had to be rebuilt constantly as the glacier moved slowly but steadily downhill.
The federal investigative committee said the bomb exploded with the force of 200 grammes of TNT at most, and left a metre-wide crater on the railbed but did not damage the engine.
Escape by individual moose occurred mostly where a discontinuity in the habitat/ setting adjacent to the railbed was encountered (e.
The hope is that these will be reconstructed for the benefit of hikers, skiers, bikers and railway buffs who come from afar to admire the matchless scenery along the railbed.
Hike and bike on a railbed used during dam construction.
1953), a railbed was weakened by water; in Illinois Merchant's Trust, 4 BTA 103 (1926), pilings rotted--and in this case, asbestos fireproofing became friable over time from exposure to air.
Robinson walks along the future railbed and explains what is yet to come.