rails


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rail 1

 (rāl)
n.
1.
a. A bar extending horizontally between supports, as in a fence.
b. A structure made of such bars and supports and forming a barrier or guard; a railing.
2. A steel bar used, usually in pairs, as a track for railroad cars or other wheeled vehicles.
3. Sports A grind rail.
4. The railroad as a means of transportation: goods transported by rail.
5. A horizontal framing member in a door or in paneling.
tr.v. railed, rail·ing, rails
To supply or enclose with rails or a rail.

[Middle English raile, from Old French reille, from Latin rēgula, straight piece of wood, ruler; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

rail 2

 (rāl)
n.
Any of various marsh birds of the family Rallidae, found worldwide and characteristically having brownish plumage and short wings.

[Middle English rale, from Old French rasle, probably named for their harsh cries and from Old French *rasler, to make a harsh noise (attested in Middle French rasler, to haggle, bellow like a stag), akin to Old French rasclar, to harrow, rake, from Old Provençal rasclar; see raclette.]

rail 3

 (rāl)
intr.v. railed, rail·ing, rails
To express objections or criticisms in bitter, harsh, or abusive language. See Synonyms at scold.

[Middle English railen, from Old French railler, to tease, joke, from Old Provençal ralhar, to chat, joke, from Vulgar Latin *ragulāre, to bray, from Late Latin ragere.]

rail′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rails - a bar or pair of parallel bars of rolled steel making the railway along which railroad cars or other vehicles can rollrails - a bar or pair of parallel bars of rolled steel making the railway along which railroad cars or other vehicles can roll
bar - a rigid piece of metal or wood; usually used as a fastening or obstruction or weapon; "there were bars in the windows to prevent escape"
railroad track, railway, railroad - a line of track providing a runway for wheels; "he walked along the railroad track"
third rail - a rail through which electric current is supplied to an electric locomotive
streetcar track, tramline, tramway - the track on which trams or streetcars run
Translations
koľajnice
References in classic literature ?
But suppose the Hindoos or Indians pull up the rails," replied Stuart; "suppose they stop the trains, pillage the luggage-vans, and scalp the passengers
They were settled firmly down behind posts and rails.
The train, jerking at regular intervals at the junctions of the rails, rolled by the platform, past a stone wall, a signal-box, past other trains; the wheels, moving more smoothly and evenly, resounded with a slight clang on the rails.
By and by they came to the place where steel rails were made; and Jurgis heard a toot behind him, and jumped out of the way of a car with a white-hot ingot upon it, the size of a man's body.
exclaimed the indignant official, spiking a loose tie across the rails.
I never was in a better box than that, and the sides were not so high but that I could see all that went on through the iron rails that were at the top.
All on the Mary Turner, fore and aft, lined the rail and stared down apprehensively at the leviathan that was as long as the schooner.
Brave soldiers leading Zionists, deserving novelists, noble ladies, congested the narrow passage and thrust distinguished elbows into ribs the world would not willingly let break, deeming themselves fortunate if they could see "just a little bit of the rail.
Or, if passengers desire to visit Parma (famous for Correggio's frescoes) and Bologna, they can by rail go on to Florence, and rejoin the steamer at Leghorn, thus spending about three weeks amid the cities most famous for art in Italy.
Seated on the rail, with their hands in their pockets and their backs turned to Mr.
From the whaleboat, up the low side of the Arangi, and over her six- inch rail of teak to her teak deck, was but a step, and Tom Haggin made it easily with Jerry still under his arm.
At the other end was placed a small stand, with a low rail around the edge of it, for Billina and her chicks.