raiment


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rai·ment

 (rā′mənt)
n.
Clothing; garments.

[Middle English, short for araiment, from Old French areement, array, from areer, arrayer, to array; see array.]

raiment

(ˈreɪmənt)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) archaic or poetic attire; clothing; garments
[C15: shortened from arrayment, from Old French areement; see array]

rai•ment

(ˈreɪ mənt)

n.
clothing; apparel; attire.
[1350–1400; Middle English rayment, aph. variant of arrayment. See array, -ment]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.raiment - especially fine or decorative clothingraiment - especially fine or decorative clothing
article of clothing, clothing, habiliment, wearable, vesture, wear - a covering designed to be worn on a person's body
war paint - full ceremonial regalia
Verb1.raiment - provide with clothes or put clothes onraiment - provide with clothes or put clothes on; "Parents must feed and dress their child"
prim out, prim up, prim - dress primly
dress, get dressed - put on clothes; "we had to dress quickly"; "dress the patient"; "Can the child dress by herself?"
wrap up, cover - clothe, as if for protection from the elements; "cover your head!"
jacket - put a jacket on; "The men were jacketed"
frock - put a frock on
shirt - put a shirt on
habit - put a habit on
vesture - provide or cover with a cloak
overclothe, overdress - dress too warmly; "You should not overclothe the child--she will be too hot"
underdress - dress without sufficient warmth; "She was underdressed for the hiking trip and suffered hypothermia"
corset - dress with a corset
shoe - furnish with shoes; "the children were well shoed"
coat - cover or provide with a coat
costume, dress up - dress in a costume; "We dressed up for Halloween as pumpkins"
robe, vest - clothe formally; especially in ecclesiastical robes
gown - dress in a gown
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"

raiment

noun
Articles worn to cover the body:
apparel, attire, clothes, clothing, dress, garment (used in plural), habiliment (often used in plural).
Informal: dud (used in plural), tog (used in plural).
Slang: thread (used in plural).
Translations

raiment

[ˈreɪmənt] N (= liter) → vestido m, vestimenta f

raiment

n (liter)Gewand nt (liter)
References in classic literature ?
Here, Robin, change your raiment with me, and we will see if my lord knows an old woman when he sees her.
Give him my name, good sir, the name of Peter the fuller, of Lymington, and ask him for a change of raiment, that I may pursue my journey without delay.
They seemed clad in the skins of beasts, so torn and bepatched the raiment that had survived nearly four years of cruising.
The vivid colours of their draped raiment and the gold of their earrings invested with a barbaric and regal magnificence their figures, stepping out freely in a shower of broken sunshine.
By his subtly simple method of treatment, lofty themes are clothed in the bright raiment of poetry.
To him fine raiment was allied to weakness, and all good coats covered faint hearts.
But as I had no holiday raiment, I was not a little puzzled to devise some means of decorating myself.
No sooner had they reached the mules, than the Jew, with hasty and trembling hands, secured behind the saddle a small bag of blue buckram, which he took from under his cloak, containing, as be muttered, ``a change of raiment only a change of raiment.
Here the Graces bathed her, and anointed her with oil of ambrosia such as the immortal gods make use of, and they clothed her in raiment of the most enchanting beauty.
He was frighted even to the marrow, and was minded to give order for your instant enlargement, and that you be clothed in fine raiment and lodged as befitted one so great; but then came Merlin and spoiled all; for he persuaded the king that you are mad, and know not whereof you speak; and said your threat is but foolish- ness and idle vaporing.
To him also I had to relate my adventures, which surprised him much, and when I had finished he ordered that I should be supplied with food and raiment and treated with consideration.
The lines seemed pearls to me and his voice sweet as syrup; and afterwards, I may say ever since then, looking at the misfortune into which I have fallen, I have thought that poets, as Plato advised, ought to he banished from all well-ordered States; at least the amatory ones, for they write verses, not like those of 'The Marquis of Mantua,' that delight and draw tears from the women and children, but sharp-pointed conceits that pierce the heart like soft thorns, and like the lightning strike it, leaving the raiment uninjured.