rain shadow

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rain shadow

n.
An area having relatively little precipitation due to the effect of a barrier, such as a mountain range, that causes the prevailing winds to lose their moisture before reaching it.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rain shadow

n
(Physical Geography) the relatively dry area on the leeward side of high ground in the path of rain-bearing winds
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rain shadow - an area that has little precipitation because some barrier causes the winds to lose their moisture before reaching it
area, country - a particular geographical region of indefinite boundary (usually serving some special purpose or distinguished by its people or culture or geography); "it was a mountainous area"; "Bible country"
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although rain shadows (i.e., leeside reductions of precipitation downwind of orography) are commonly described in textbooks, quantitative climatologies of the rain-shadow effect are rare.
Rain shadows are described in geography, climatology, and meteorology textbooks (e.g., Marshak 2008, p.
Certainly the published literature refers to rain shadows at all time scales, from instantaneous radar imagery (e.g., Brady and Waldstreicher 2001) to storm-total precipitation (e.g., Ralph et al.
Siler and Durran (2016) found that the reason for these weak rain shadows was the reduced leeside mountain waves caused by the low-level stable air that precedes the warm front.
Tests 1 and 2 are the types of bulk precipitation amount and frequency statistics that are often employed to explain rain shadows. For example, these bulk climatological data are often used to explain the rain-shadow effect from west to east across the United Kingdom (e.g., Hill 1983; Sweeney and O'Hare 1992; Hand 2005).
Other regions around the world show more dramatic rain shadows than the Peak District, and an intercomparison between the different ranges to quantify the different factors affecting the rain shadows in different geographical contexts would be an interesting application of this work, a point raised by Barros and Lettenmaier (1994).
These and other questions could form the basis for future research on rain shadows. Such work would go a long way to exploring beyond the simple textbook explanation for the weather patterns across the Peak District, as well as other mountain ranges.
We thank Chairman of the Editorial Board Jeff Waldstreicher for his comments on rain shadows.
Researchers have long known that mountainous regions divert wind streams and create "rain shadows" on their leeward sides.