raisonneur


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raisonneur

(ˌreɪzɒˈnɜː) (French rezɔnœr)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a character that acts as the voice of the author or dramatist
2. a person who thinks or philosophizes
References in periodicals archive ?
In the theatre, the raisonneur (one who argues or reasons) is the character who speaks soberly, sincerely, carefully.
Esse sofrimento, que em O Precipicio de Faetonte a personagem Fiton (tipico raisonneur do teatro do periodo) tentou evitar a todo custo, e parte fundamental do sentimento cortesao, uma vez que a paixao e sinal de sofrimento, da prevalencia do destino sobre o individuo livre.
The main candidate, Cleante the raisonneur, inhabits a moral universe outside the scope of the true-false debate.
In these stories, male raisonneur characters adopt methods of extracting themselves from suffering by relativizing the importance of their experiences in the present.
This invitation to confirmation bias is aided by the fact that Mardonius, in his moralizing chastisement, reveals himself to be a dramatic type as well: the raisonneur of comedy.
E lo stesso commissario, figura salvifica di conservatore dell'ordine sociale, non si fa anch'esso soggetto epico (Puppa, 2003: 49), erede del ruolo del raisonneur reinventato da Pirandello e dai grotteschi?
The centrality of Archer's Machiavellian raisonneur, in what at first glance might pass for an imperial adventure drama peopled by various stalwart types of tweedy Britishness, gives The Green Goddess its slightly off-centre impact.
Bien que Rosalie et Theodon, le raisonneur de la piEce, soient des personnages que "La Chaussee was prepared to take virtually unchanged from an established comic tradition" en revanche, "those of Melanide herself, d'Orvigny and d'Arviane, on the other hand, all reflect in their different ways the new sensibility of La Chaussee's own age, and the new importance given to subjective feeling as the touchstone in moral question" (14).
The first two of these novels foreground the stream-of-consciousness Faulkner, the writer who fashioned a kind of neural discourse, indeed neural poetry, that was new to American literature: the tortured divagations of idiot Benjy and suicidal Quentin and son-of-a-bitch Jason Compson, each delivering his painful aria to Caddy who loved and left; and the in-the-deep and on-the-fly renditions of traumatized Bundrens: Dari the precarious one who invades others with his vision, Vardaman the unhinged child, Cash the homespun raisonneur, Dewey Dell with growing seed, Jewel the primitive and pure.
The stories are partly re-enacted in front of us and partly retold by the elderly Italian-Canadian Joe, the raisonneur of the play, who, in Craig Stewart Walker's words, "carries all the history of his multicultural neighbourhood in his memory" (407).
This paper therefore provides a reading of Woe from Wit as a tragicomedy and, in doing so, shows how it anticipated many of Chekhov's dramatic techniques: an undermined raisonneur and concomitant authorial distancing, a domino effect of unrequited love, constant miscommunication and disconnect between all characters, and the incorporation of elements of commedia dell'arte.
Indeed, the raisonneur figure (ragione in Italian, often translated into English as "reasoner") is a dominant feature of Pirandello's fictional work, and the exclusive subject of its tortured speculations is the existential repercussions of a profound and tragic insight into the nature of the world.