rajah


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ra·ja

or ra·jah  (rä′jə, -zhə)
n.
A prince, chief, or ruler in India or the East Indies.

[Hindi rājā, from Sanskrit, king; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]
Word History: Raja is familiar to us from the Sanskrit rājā, "king," and mahārājā, "great king." The Sanskrit root raj-, "to rule," comes from the Indo-European root *reg-, "to move in a straight line, direct, rule." The same root appears in Italic (Latin) and Celtic. Rēx means "king" in Latin, coming from *reg-s, whence our regal and, through French, royal. Two of the Gaulish kings familiar to us from Caesar, Dumnorix and Vercingetorix, incorporate the Celtic word rīx, "king," in their names. (Rīx also forms part of the name of that fictitious Gaul Asterix.) Germanic at some time borrowed the Celtic word rīx. It appears as reiks, "ruler," in Gothic, as well as in older Germanic names ending in -ric, such as Alaric and Theodoric, the latter of whom has a name that is equivalent to German Dietrich, "people's king." A derivative of Celtic rīx, *rīg-yo-, meaning "rule, domain," was also borrowed into Germanic, and is the source of German Reich, "rule, empire."
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rajah

(ˈrɑːdʒə) or

raja

n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in India, formerly) a ruler or landlord: sometimes used as a form of address or as a title preceding a name
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a Malayan or Javanese prince or chieftain
[C16: from Hindi rājā, from Sanskrit rājan king; see raj; compare Latin rex king]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ra•jah

or ra•ja

(ˈrɑ dʒə)

n., pl. -jahs or -jas.
a title of princes and chieftains in India and areas of Southeast Asia once subject to Indian influence.
[1545–55; < Hindi rājā; compare Skt rājan; c. Old Irish rí, Latin rēx king]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rajah - a prince or king in Indiarajah - a prince or king in India    
aristocrat, blue blood, patrician - a member of the aristocracy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
راجا: أمير أو مَلِك في الهِنْد
rádža
raja
indiai fejedelem
fursti
radža
radža
raca

rajah

[ˈrɑːdʒə] Nrajá m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

rajah

[ˈrɑːdʒə] nrajah m, radja m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

rajah

nRadscha m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

rajah

[ˈrɑːdʒə] nragià m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

rajah

(ˈraːdʒə) noun
an Indian king or prince.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
It was the body of an old man, gorgeously arrayed in the habiliments of a rajah, wearing, as in life, a turban embroidered with pearls, a robe of tissue of silk and gold, a scarf of cashmere sewed with diamonds, and the magnificent weapons of a Hindoo prince.
"Is that of the prince, her husband," said the guide; "an independent rajah of Bundelcund."
The Rajah Muda Saffir, tiring of the excuses and delays which Bududreen interposed to postpone the fulfillment of his agreement with the former, whereby he was to deliver into the hands of the rajah a certain beautiful maiden, decided at last to act upon his own initiative.
When they caught up with Rajah Muda Saffir near the beach, they narrated a fearful tale of fifty terrible white men with whom they had battled valiantly, killing many, before they had been compelled to retreat in the face of terrific odds.
"Once in India I saw a boy who was a Rajah. He had rubies and emeralds and diamonds stuck all over him.
That's the 'Rajah,' and we will go aboard if we can."
Here is a virtuous and high-born widow of a Hill Rajah on pilgrimage, she says, to Buddha Gay.
"'There is a rajah in the northern provinces who has much wealth, though his lands are small.
He killed a king cobra that had been seen in the Rajah's garden.