rampageous


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ram·pa·geous

 (răm-pā′jəs)
adj.
Raging; frenzied: "the hot rampageous horses of my will" (W.H. Auden).

ram·pa′geous·ly adv.

ram•pa•geous

(ræmˈpeɪ dʒəs)

adj.
violent; unruly; boisterous.
[1815–25]
ram•pa′geous•ly, adv.
ram•pa′geous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rampageous - displaying raging violence; often destructive; "the hot rampageous horses of my will"- W.H.Auden
violent - acting with or marked by or resulting from great force or energy or emotional intensity; "a violent attack"; "a violent person"; "violent feelings"; "a violent rage"; "felt a violent dislike"
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References in periodicals archive ?
Yes, family visits were restricted in the early days of his incarceration, since he used those visits to pass instructions to his rampageous following that terrorised the nation.
The larger-than-life combats between the robot Chitthi and the rampageous environmentalist Pakshi Rajan(so called, because he loves birds, isn't that subtle?) are staged with the frenzied determination of religious rallies on roads orchestrated by red-eyed youngsters who don't know any better.
After several rampageous springtime showcase-style shows at The Great Escape in Brighton, Sound City in Liverpool, Camden Rocks in London and NARC.Fest back home in Newcastle Coquin Migale will be playing the following festivals: Harvest From The Deep - A Festival, in North Shields on August 13; Reading Festival (BBC Introducing Stage) on August 26; Leeds Festival (BBC Introducing Stage) on August 28; Lindisfarne Festival (BBC Introducing Stage) on September 3; Twisterella Festival in Middlesbrough on October 8; and Oxjam Festival in Newcastle on October 16.
A weed all said and done is only the wrong plant in the wrong place, many of our herbaceous perennials are rampageous thugs if left unchecked.
It's not only in Russia that such rampageous acts are followed by legal firm reactions.
How strange to discover the trouble Strauss originally had in writing slow music, when writing fast music seems never to have posed him the slightest problem, as is confirmed by the rampageous opening of "Don Juan," his first out-and-out orchestral triumph.