ramus


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Related to ramus: Ramus of mandible

ra·mus

 (rā′məs)
n. pl. ra·mi (-mī′)
1. A branch, as of a nerve or blood vessel, or a projecting part, as of a rotifer or crustacean.
2. A bony process extending like a branch from a larger bone, especially the ascending part of the lower jaw that makes a joint at the temple.

[Latin rāmus, branch; see wrād- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ramus

(ˈreɪməs)
n, pl -mi (-maɪ)
1. (Zoology) the barb of a bird's feather
2. (Zoology) either of the two parts of the lower jaw of a vertebrate
3. (Biology) any part or organ that branches from another part
[C19: from Latin: branch]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ra•mus

(ˈreɪ məs)

n., pl. -mi (-mī).
a small branch, as of a stem, vein, or bone.
[1795–1805; < Latin rāmus branch, twig, bough]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ramus - the posterior part of the mandible that is more or less verticalramus - the posterior part of the mandible that is more or less vertical
condylion - the craniometric point at the tip of the mandibular condyle
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ra·mus

n. L. rama, bifurcación, división.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
But Aristotle was out of all patience with the account I gave him of Scotus and Ramus, as I presented them to him; and he asked them, "whether the rest of the tribe were as great dunces as themselves?"
The shape, as well as the breadth and length of the ramus of the lower jaw, varies in a highly remarkable manner.
On the other hand, the mandibular ramus has been used with low indices of neurosensory alterations (Reininger et al.); this anatomical zone does not generally present any significant morphological consequences and is not associated with dental alterations when the bone is removed.
Optimal methods of fixation also can be planned before the operation with the customary combination of bicortical positional screws at the ramus and fracture plates using nonlocking screws across the vertical osteotomy at the body.
In her introduction (9-25), Couzinet prepares the subsequent argument convincingly by providing some initial thoughts on early French humanism and its development in the sixteenth century, which paved the way for Ramus's reforms.
Ramus said she's expecting 35,000 to 40,000 people during the four days - more than usual.
In case of marginal mandibular nerve having two or more rami the relation of each ramus present above and below was recorded separately.
Before proceeding to Ramus, however, Mack summarizes the contributions of Erasmus, certainly the most influential of Renaissance rhetoricians.
The widespread influence of the educational theories of Petrus Ramus in areas that include logic, rhetoric, visual techniques, and mathematics is described in the 12 essays of this revelatory volume.
A technetium bone scan was performed and demonstrated abnormal uptake about the right superior pubic ramus and the left pubic rami.
I have wondered if his observation grew out of his own experience of distance from his native American culture as he lived abroad for almost four years (1950 to 1953) researching the work of Peter Ramus (1515-1572) and his antecedents and his followers and his critics.

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