rapaciously


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ra·pa·cious

 (rə-pā′shəs)
adj.
1. Having or showing a strong or excessive desire to acquire money or possess things; greedy: "dishonest utilities and rapacious energy traders" (Paul Roberts).
2. Living by killing prey, especially in large numbers: rapacious coyotes.
3. Taking things by force; plundering: rapacious pirates.

[From Latin rapāx, rapāc-, from rapere, to seize; see rep- in Indo-European roots.]

ra·pa′cious·ly adv.
ra·pac′i·ty (rə-păs′ĭ-tē), ra·pa′cious·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.rapaciously - in a rapacious manner
Translations
بِجَشَع، بِنَهَم
chamtivě
griskt
kapzsin
græîgislega
aç gözlülükle

rapaciously

[rəˈpeɪʃəslɪ] ADVcon rapacidad

rapaciously

[rəˈpeɪʃəslɪ] adv (frm) → rapacemente

rapacious

(rəˈpeiʃəs) adjective
greedy (especially for money); eager to seize as much as possible.
raˈpaciously adverb
raˈpaciousness noun
raˈpacity (-ˈpӕsə-) noun
References in periodicals archive ?
In my village, Quezon City Mayor Herbert 'Bistek' Bautista has rapaciously ordered the wanton digging of our pavements on both sides of our roads by bulldozers backstopped by brigades of workers.
With no doubt, the interpretation of Santiago as a symbol of "code hero" is universally accepted, yet, Nie, in this book, introduces the Jungle Rule to his analysis of the old man and gains from his failure the insight that human beings should prevent themselves from ethical chaos to "avoid degenerating themselves into animal and shoulder the ethical responsibility to maintain a harmonious relation with nature other than grab rapaciously from it according to Jungle Law" (214).
debut is twofold: K-pop is an active surrogate of the American cultural hegemony and hypercommercialism that rapaciously commodifies anything marketable, and Korean society has become exponentially more Americanized while confronting and adapting neoliberal doctrines since the 1997 IMF crises.
He enjoyed some luck, especially early on, but seized rapaciously on anything loose on his way to 75 (110 balls, 12 fours).
He wished he were wearing a shirt; with his height, there was so <i>much</i> of him for Tobias to stare at rapaciously.
Much as she may seem deadened, Malkina responds more completely, even rapaciously to experience, without the burden of expectations about how she ought to act.
William Kenrick pounced rapaciously on Johnson's edition first in the October and November issues of the Monthly Review (1765) and then in the same year at much greater length in his Review of Doctor Johnsons New Edition of Shakespeare (133 pages), charging him with plagiarism as well as deliberate neglect of Edwards's Canons in the notes.
2) What these approaches fail to elaborate is the network of relations that enabled the production of these images in the first place as well as the politico-cultural context, which made them so rapaciously consumable as visual and exotic objects, not to mention meaningful.
Without a doubt, the interpretation of Santiago as a symbol of "code hero" is universally accepted, yet Nie introduces the Jungle Law to his analysis of the old man and gains from his failure the insight that human beings should prevent themselves from ethical chaos to "avoid degenerating themselves into animal and shoulder the ethical responsibility to maintain a harmonious relation with nature other than grab rapaciously from it according to Jungle Law"(214).
He and Chopra, assisted by some poor fielding, paced the pursuit nicely and, after they fell, Evans rounded it off rapaciously, abetted by Ateeq Javed's astute and faultless innings of 0 not out from 0 balls (no fours, no sixes).
The global economic network, or network of networks, rapaciously seeks to connect and integrate all that must be aligned and coordinated according to its logic of capital accumulation.
Indeed, so rapaciously and recklessly were the rulers out to make fortunes illicitly with both hands as if a new day was never to dawn and they had not to go again to the electorate to seek a fresh mandate.