raptor


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raptor

one who seizes by force; robber; a raptorial bird
Not to be confused with:
rapture – ecstatic joy; bliss; beatitude

rap·tor

 (răp′tər)
n.
A bird of prey.

[Latin, one who seizes, from rapere, to seize; see rapt.]

raptor

(ˈræptə)
n
1. (Zoology) another name for bird of prey
2. (Animals) informal a carnivorous bipedal dinosaur of the late Cretaceous period
[C17: from Latin: plunderer, from rapere to take by force]

rap•tor

(ˈræp tər, -tɔr)

n.
a raptorial bird; bird of prey.
[1600–10; < Latin raptor one who seizes by force, robber]

rap·tor

(răp′tər)
1. A bird of prey, such as a hawk, eagle, or owl.
2. Any of various mostly small, slender, meat-eating dinosaurs of the Cretaceous Period. Raptors had hind legs that were adapted for leaping and large, curved claws used for grasping and tearing at prey. Raptors were probably related to birds, and some even had feathers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.raptor - any of numerous carnivorous birds that hunt and kill other animalsraptor - any of numerous carnivorous birds that hunt and kill other animals
bird - warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
Accipitriformes, order Accipitriformes - in some classifications an alternative name for the Falconiformes
hawk - diurnal bird of prey typically having short rounded wings and a long tail
bird of Jove, eagle - any of various large keen-sighted diurnal birds of prey noted for their broad wings and strong soaring flight
vulture - any of various large diurnal birds of prey having naked heads and weak claws and feeding chiefly on carrion
Sagittarius serpentarius, secretary bird - large long-legged African bird of prey that feeds on reptiles
bird of Minerva, bird of night, owl, hooter - nocturnal bird of prey with hawk-like beak and claws and large head with front-facing eyes
Translations

raptor

[ˈræptəʳ] Nave f raptora

raptor

[ˈræptər] n (= bird of prey) → rapace m

raptor

n (Zool) → Raubvogel m
References in periodicals archive ?
"The scheme holds no records for the region prior to 2017, so I was delighted to receive the news from one of our local raptor experts from the Scottish Raptor Study Group that a pair of Marsh Harriers have successfully reared chicks in Clackmannanshire again this year.
An F-150 Raptor in the UK doesn't work that well because our roads are too small and our petrol too expensive.
The Toronto Symphony Orchestra, swept up in a Canada-wide frenzy over the prospect of the Raptors winning their first NBA championship Thursday, sounded the charge with a rendering of the "Jurassic Park" movie soundtrack.
The Raptor has been developed by Ford Performance, which is behind some of the firm's best performanceorientated models - as you'd expect, given the name.
But the Raptor couldn't care less because Tarmac is not its favourite surface.
A photo shared on a NASASpaceFlight.com discussion (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=47120.msg1920974#msg1920974) forum showed&nbsp;a structure believed to be the next-gen Raptor engine being built inside&nbsp;SpaceX's Boca Chica Village launch site.
Urban Raptors: Ecology and Conservation of Birds of Prey in Cities
With more horsepower and torque than any other truck on the market, the F-150 Raptor's benchmark dependability and capability in extreme conditions open the frontiers to adventure.
That's very appropriate as the Raptor is a real flying machine thanks its racing roots, light weight and powerful engines.
Volume growth on BCP Raptor's system has been underperforming Fitch's prior expectations.
Synopsis: Raptors are an unusual success story of wildness thriving in the heart of our cities and they have developed substantial populations around the world in recent decades.
Ford Motor Company (NYSE: F), a United States-based automaker, has upgraded its 2019 F-150 Raptor.