rarely


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rare·ly

 (râr′lē)
adv.
1. Not often; infrequently: "The truth is rarely pure and never simple" (Oscar Wilde).
2. Archaic
a. In an unusual degree; exceptionally: "a rarely good judge of the best in modern literature" (Frank Harris).
b. With uncommon excellence: "You can write rarely now, after all your schooling" (George Eliot).
Usage Note: The use of ever after adverbs such as rarely, seldom, hardly, and scarcely has often been criticized as redundant, and not without reason. The sentence She rarely ever watches television expresses nothing that is not conveyed by She rarely watches television. While these constructions occur frequently in speech today, in print they are not used at similar rates. For some reason, both historically and in contemporary published prose, rarely ever and seldom ever are not very common, perhaps because rarely and seldom are more immediately associated with time than hardly, scarcely, and other minimizing adverbs are, and so the overlap with ever is more obvious. In any case, scarcely ever has a long and distinguished track record of use by admired writers, and appears with some frequency in contemporary prose: "The cold air of the fall morning had blown in through the rusted seams of the sort of vehicle that nobody in her family ever rode in, that scarcely ever appeared on the streets where she lived" (Alice Munro). Similarly, the construction hardly ever also has a long history of use by distinguished writers, including modern ones: "When he was dead I realized that I had hardly ever spoken to him" (James Baldwin). It seems then that scarcely ever and hardly ever, though technically redundant, are valued for their emphatic expressiveness, while rarely ever and seldom ever have not won such favor. They are therefore best avoided. See Usage Note at hardly.

rarely

(ˈrɛəlɪ)
adv
1. hardly ever; seldom: I'm rarely in town these days.
2. to an unusual degree; exceptionally
3. dialect uncommonly well; excellently: he did rarely at market yesterday.
Usage: Since rarely means hardly ever, one should not say something rarely ever happens

rare•ly

(ˈrɛər li)

adv.
1. on rare occasions.
2. exceptionally; in or to an unusual degree.
3. unusually or remarkably well.
[1515–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.rarely - not often; "we rarely met"
frequently, oft, often, oftentimes, ofttimes - many times at short intervals; "we often met over a cup of coffee"

rarely

adverb seldom, hardly, almost never, hardly ever, little, once in a while, infrequently, on rare occasions, once in a blue moon, only now and then, scarcely ever I rarely wear a raincoat because I spend most of my time in a car.
seldom often, commonly, usually, regularly, frequently

rarely

adverb
Translations
نَادِراًنادِراً
zřídka
sjældent
harvoin
rijetko
sjaldan
めったに・・・しない
드물게
redko
sällan
นานๆ ครั้ง
nadirenender olarak
hiếm khi

rarely

[ˈrɛəlɪ] ADVcasi nunca, rara vez, raramente
that rarely happenscasi nunca or rara vez sucede eso
that method is rarely satisfactoryese método no es satisfactorio casi nunca
it is rarely found hereaquí se encuentra con poca frecuencia

rarely

[ˈrɛərli] advrarement

rarely

advselten

rarely

[ˈrɛəlɪ] advdi rado, raramente

rare

(ˈreə) adjective
1. not done, found, seen etc very often; uncommon. a rare flower; a rare occurrence.
2. (of meat) only slightly cooked. I like my steak rare.
ˈrareness noun
ˈrarely adverb
not often. I rarely go to bed before midnight.
ˈrarity noun
1. the state of being uncommon.
2. (plural ˈrarities) something which is uncommon. This stamp is quite a rarity.

rarely

نَادِراً zřídka sjældent selten σπανίως casi nunca, ocasionalmente harvoin rarement rijetko raramente めったに・・・しない 드물게 zelden sjelden rzadko raramente редко sällan นานๆ ครั้ง nadiren hiếm khi 很少地

rarely

adv raras veces
References in classic literature ?
They were afraid of Jesse and rarely spoke when he was about.
Pontellier left his home in the mornings between nine and ten o'clock, and rarely returned before half-past six or seven in the evening--dinner being served at half-past seven.
While the husbandman shrank back from the dangerous passes, within the safer boundaries of the more ancient settlements, armies larger than those that had often disposed of the scepters of the mother countries, were seen to bury themselves in these forests, whence they rarely returned but in skeleton bands, that were haggard with care or dejected by defeat.
But there is no one thing which men so rarely do, whatever the provocation or inducement, as to bequeath patrimonial property away from their own blood.
Or -- but this more rarely happened -- she would be convulsed with rage of grief and sob out her love for her mother in broken words, and seem intent on proving that she had a heart by breaking it.
So rarely is it beheld, that though one and all of them declare it to be the largest animated thing in the ocean, yet very few of them have any but the most vague ideas concerning its true nature and form; notwithstanding, they believe it to furnish to the sperm whale his only food.
It was an admirable artistic exploit, rarely achieved by the best harpooneers of the present day; inasmuch as this Leviathan was slain at the very first dart.
Others--as most legislators, politicians, lawyers, ministers, and office-holders--serve the state chiefly with their heads; and, as the rarely make any moral distinctions, they are as likely to serve the devil, without intending it, as God.
The discourse was resumed presently, but it went lame and halting, all possibility of impressiveness being at an end; for even the gravest sentiments were constantly being received with a smothered burst of unholy mirth, under cover of some remote pew-back, as if the poor parson had said a rarely facetious thing.
Knightleys; their subjects totally distinct, or very rarely mixingand Emma only occasionally joining in one or the other.
To speak truth, I had not the least wish to go into company, for in company I was very rarely noticed; and if Bessie had but been kind and companionable, I should have deemed it a treat to spend the evenings quietly with her, instead of passing them under the formidable eye of Mrs.
I remember the master, before he fell into a doze, stroking her bonny hair - it pleased him rarely to see her gentle - and saying, 'Why canst thou not always be a good lass, Cathy?