rarely


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rare·ly

 (râr′lē)
adv.
1. Not often; infrequently: "The truth is rarely pure and never simple" (Oscar Wilde).
2. Archaic
a. In an unusual degree; exceptionally: "a rarely good judge of the best in modern literature" (Frank Harris).
b. With uncommon excellence: "You can write rarely now, after all your schooling" (George Eliot).
Usage Note: The use of ever after adverbs such as rarely, seldom, hardly, and scarcely has often been criticized as redundant, and not without reason. The sentence She rarely ever watches television expresses nothing that is not conveyed by She rarely watches television. While these constructions occur frequently in speech today, in print they are not used at similar rates. For some reason, both historically and in contemporary published prose, rarely ever and seldom ever are not very common, perhaps because rarely and seldom are more immediately associated with time than hardly, scarcely, and other minimizing adverbs are, and so the overlap with ever is more obvious. In any case, scarcely ever has a long and distinguished track record of use by admired writers, and appears with some frequency in contemporary prose: "The cold air of the fall morning had blown in through the rusted seams of the sort of vehicle that nobody in her family ever rode in, that scarcely ever appeared on the streets where she lived" (Alice Munro). Similarly, the construction hardly ever also has a long history of use by distinguished writers, including modern ones: "When he was dead I realized that I had hardly ever spoken to him" (James Baldwin). It seems then that scarcely ever and hardly ever, though technically redundant, are valued for their emphatic expressiveness, while rarely ever and seldom ever have not won such favor. They are therefore best avoided. See Usage Note at hardly.

rarely

(ˈrɛəlɪ)
adv
1. hardly ever; seldom: I'm rarely in town these days.
2. to an unusual degree; exceptionally
3. dialect uncommonly well; excellently: he did rarely at market yesterday.
Usage: Since rarely means hardly ever, one should not say something rarely ever happens

rare•ly

(ˈrɛər li)

adv.
1. on rare occasions.
2. exceptionally; in or to an unusual degree.
3. unusually or remarkably well.
[1515–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.rarely - not often; "we rarely met"
frequently, oft, often, oftentimes, ofttimes - many times at short intervals; "we often met over a cup of coffee"

rarely

adverb seldom, hardly, almost never, hardly ever, little, once in a while, infrequently, on rare occasions, once in a blue moon, only now and then, scarcely ever I rarely wear a raincoat because I spend most of my time in a car.
seldom often, commonly, usually, regularly, frequently

rarely

adverb
Translations
نَادِراًنادِراً
zřídka
sjældent
harvoin
rijetko
sjaldan
めったに・・・しない
드물게
redko
sällan
นานๆ ครั้ง
nadirenender olarak
hiếm khi

rarely

[ˈrɛəlɪ] ADVcasi nunca, rara vez, raramente
that rarely happenscasi nunca or rara vez sucede eso
that method is rarely satisfactoryese método no es satisfactorio casi nunca
it is rarely found hereaquí se encuentra con poca frecuencia

rarely

[ˈrɛərli] advrarement

rarely

advselten

rarely

[ˈrɛəlɪ] advdi rado, raramente

rare

(ˈreə) adjective
1. not done, found, seen etc very often; uncommon. a rare flower; a rare occurrence.
2. (of meat) only slightly cooked. I like my steak rare.
ˈrareness noun
ˈrarely adverb
not often. I rarely go to bed before midnight.
ˈrarity noun
1. the state of being uncommon.
2. (plural ˈrarities) something which is uncommon. This stamp is quite a rarity.

rarely

نَادِراً zřídka sjældent selten σπανίως casi nunca, ocasionalmente harvoin rarement rijetko raramente めったに・・・しない 드물게 zelden sjelden rzadko raramente редко sällan นานๆ ครั้ง nadiren hiếm khi 很少地

rarely

adv raras veces
References in classic literature ?
Quintillian's (11) judgment on Hesiod that `he rarely rises to great heights...
This interference aroused in him a feeling of angry hatred--a feeling he had rarely known before.
It has rarely been attempted to be employed, but against the weaker members; and in most instances attempts to coerce the refractory and disobedient have been the signals of bloody wars, in which one half of the confederacy has displayed its banners against the other half.
At certain seasons of the year, when meat was scarce, it was rarely that the children who were not old enough or strong enough to work in the fields would have the luxury of meat.
When Claude and Quasimodo went out together, which frequently happened, and when they were seen traversing in company, the valet behind the master, the cold, narrow, and gloomy streets of the block of Notre-Dame, more than one evil word, more than one ironical quaver, more than one insulting jest greeted them on their way, unless Claude Frollo, which was rarely the case, walked with head upright and raised, showing his severe and almost august brow to the dumbfounded jeerers.
As this is one of those deep observations which very few readers can be supposed capable of making themselves, I have thought proper to lend them my assistance; but this is a favour rarely to be expected in the course of my work.
The sun's heat is rarely strong enough to burn, even when it is focused by dewdrops, as is sometimes the case in more tropical districts.
He boasted that he had never dwelt where he might not safely fell every tree he could view from his own threshold; that the law had rarely been known to enter his clearing, and that his ears had never willingly admitted the sound of a church bell.
This period will seldom be remote in any extreme degree, as species very rarely endure for more than one geological period.
You must except, nevertheless, Marcus Antonius, the half partner of the empire of Rome, and Appius Claudius, the decemvir and lawgiver; whereof the former was indeed a voluptuous man, and inordinate; but the latter was an austere and wise man: and therefore it seems (though rarely) that love can find entrance, not only into an open heart, but also into a heart well fortified, if watch be not well kept.
For although few men will avow their desires of being immortal, upon such hard conditions, yet in the two kingdoms before mentioned, of Balnibarbi and Japan, he observed that every man desired to put off death some time longer, let it approach ever so late: and he rarely heard of any man who died willingly, except he were incited by the extremity of grief or torture.
Their footsteps are often seen by the trappers in the high and solitary valleys among the mountains, and the smokes of their fires descried among the precipices, but they themselves are rarely met with, and still more rarely brought to a parley, so great is their shyness, and their dread of strangers.